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Vittoria Corsa G Plus Tire - Tubular
Sale $114.95$124.00 7% Off

Item # VIT002C

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  • Black, 700c x 23mm ($114.95)
  • Black, 700c x 25mm ($114.95)
  • Black, 700c x 28mm ($114.95)
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Item # VIT002C

Description

Luxurious.

Vittoria's all-new lineup of tires feature some pretty significant changes compared to the company's previous versions, most notably brought on by a collaboration with carbon manufacturer Directa Plus. Vittoria partnered with the manufacturer to develop a proprietary tire compound that incorporates graphene. We've heard plenty of hype around this line of tires, and the Corsa G Plus Tubular Tire sits at the top of the lineup, distinguishing itself as the brand's racing tire with a four-compound ISOtech construction and a top-of-the-line TPI that together create a supple, versatile platform.

According to Vittoria, the new 4C construction allows for more extensive fine-tuning of the base, surface, center, and side areas, so you aren't required to sacrifice low rolling resistance for responsive grip while cornering and traction on wet roads. Our own experience aboard the Corsa G Plus confirms these claims. The inclusion of graphene is credited with enhancing the tires' traction while increasing durability, and its impressive strength-to-weight ratio keeps the tire well-suited for racing by reducing rotational mass.

Vittoria claims that the addition of graphene creates an incredibly durable tire, but for even more reassurance, it adds KEVLAR to further reinforce the core spun casing. With multiple cotton fibers twisted together to create one yarn, core spun casings are significantly stronger than typical casings, and they don't add unnecessary weight to the tire. A final element that we feel sets the Corsa G Plus apart from all training and most racing tires is its luxuriously high 320 TPI. TPI measures the number of threads per inch in a tire's casing, with higher counts equating to a tire with a suppler ride, and 320 puts the Corsa G at the highest, supplest end of the spectrum.

  • Four compound construction featuring graphene
  • 320 TPI
  • Tubular

Tech Specs

Compound:
4 compound
Size:
700 c x 23 mm, 700 c x 25 mm, 700 c x 28 mm
Type:
tubular
Casing:
Corespun with KEVLAR®
TPI:
320
Claimed Weight:
[700c x 23mm] 265 g, [700c x 25mm] 280 g, [700c x 28mm] 330 g
Recommended Use:
road cycling
Manufacturer Warranty:
1 year

Reviews & Community

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Mostly the worst tire I ever had

    Great handling, awesome feeling and nice rolling resistance, but the tubular version is the worst tire I'v ever tried. Loses air avery hour, near 5 to 10 psi during a ride. Because of that if you hit a small rock o even a very tinny hole in the road you are 100% sure it will puncture.
    For more than $100 is inadmissible this quality. All of this, because of its material.

    Avg. ride time: 8h 32m per week
    • Average ride time is based on Strava activity over the last 3 months. Give your reviews credibility by connecting your account.

    Perfect

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    - Low rolling resistance (something i have to trust from other sources)
    - Easy to put on and align properly
    - Great handling in wet and dry condition
    - No issues in the gluing process
    - Typical puncture protection to previous versions
    - Expected racing lifespan around 500-600 miles, 600-1000 with an increased risk for a puncture, beyond 1000 miles i would not race the tire.
    - As always with latex tubes you will bleed air more quickly when compared to a buty tube. Typical air loss is around 2-4 psi per hour, specific conditions can alter this rate.

    Overall i would argue this is the go to racing tubular on the market.

    I have noticed that specifically with these tyres VITTORIA CORSA G PLUS TIRE - TUBULAR, that the base tape is a little sticky already as they come from the factory. I have read mixed things about cleaning and gluing them both on Vittoria's website and on the paper tag with instructions that come attached to the tyres. One says to clean the base tape with solvent(which I take to be acetone) and the other says only soapy water. What do you recommend? and also how many coats of glue do you recommend on the base tape? Thanks

    My gluing protocol, which i used a few weeks ago with this tire:



    Continental carbon tubular glue, HED stinger rim, new rim and tire.



    1. Apply 1 coat of glue to rims ( 1/2 tube of glue per rim)

    2. Wait 1-2 hours, just enough time for some of the solvent to evaporate and glue is quite tacky.

    3. Apply another coat of glue to rim (1/2 tube per rim)

    4. Right after apply a thin coat to base tape of tire, ensure the entire base tape is coated.

    5. Slightly inflate tire (15-20psi) and install on rim

    6. Align and inflate to 60-70 psi

    7. Recheck alignment and roll wheel on floor with some applied force for 3-5 minutes to ensure the tire is seated well on the rims.

    8. One last alignment check and then inflate to 120-140 psi and let sit for 2 days.



    Never rolled a tubular with this protocol in cross or road applications.

    Avg. ride time: 7h 46m per week
    • Average ride time is based on Strava activity over the last 3 months. Give your reviews credibility by connecting your account.

    Could you please tell me which valve stem the G+ tubular has. Is it the red version that you replace from the base up for a longer length, or is it a traditional type that you can remove the core from and add extenders. Thanks!

    Mine did NOT have the Vittoria valve stems that you remove and swap to the correct length. The valve core is removable, of course. I used a normal Zipp valve extender that screws in where the original valve core goes.

    You just have to removed the valve core then place a valve extender, then replace the valve core on the extender.