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Tom H.

Tom H.

Tom H.

Tom H.wrote a review of on September 3, 2019

Didn't fit
2 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

This is a high-quality, well made product from DT Swiss, but it didn't work on my frame. If your non-threaded axle hole is not counter-sunk, then this is not the thru axle for you. I think this is for a Syntace frame. If you look closely at the 2 product photos, one has a flat washer and the other a tapered washer which is not removable. The flat washer is probably on the front/fork version. I ordered the 12mm x 142mm for the rear of my Lynskey Cooper CX frame as part of a QR to TA conversion. The size and thread pitch are correct, but my frame is not tapered like the washer on the axle. Consequently, the threaded end of the axle doesn't extend all the way to the far edge of the frame, making the axle effectively a few millimeters too short. Even though it works, it's not ideal and needed to be returned.

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Tom H.

Tom H.wrote a review of on March 7, 2019

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

These gloves are extremely warm and windproof. I've used them on 2 rides so far: an hour when it was overcast and 36F and two hours at nighttime and 30F. My fingers stayed warm. Seems like you could use them down into the teens or twenties with hand warmers. Have not used them in rain yet. The measurements in the sizing chart were accurate. They have rubberized palms and fingers and grip the hoods and bars very well. They're also well padded but are not overly bulky. Braking and shifting are unimpeded. They are form-fitting, and the elastic velcro cuffs fit tight over the sleeves to seal out the cold. Fine micro suede on the thumb and forefinger wipe the nose gently and do not chafe. I don't think my hands will ever get cold again.

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Tom H.

Tom H.wrote a review of on December 31, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I got the long-cage version of this new deraillure because I wanted to run a 40-tooth MTB cassette on my 'cross bike for a gravel race in the mountains. It replaces an Ultegra 6800 long-cage RD. I wasn't sure this new combo would work, since the 40t cassette and my 46t chainring exceed the published capacity of this deraillure. After a 3-hour gravel ride yesterday with lots of steep hills, I can confirm this combo works flawlessly when paired with 46/34t Ultegra chain rings, a 6800 front deraillure, Ultegra 11-speed chain and Ultegra 6800 hydro STI levers. I put the chain in all the worst situations, like shifting from big/big to little/big and then downshifted while going uphill, and it never missed a beat.

The first adjustment I made in mounting the RD was to slam the B screw all the way down. That move provides good clearance between the top jockey wheel and the 40t sprocket. Initially I had some shifting problems, but I put in a new cable and shortened the housing, which fixed the problems. My Lynskey Cooper CX has full cable housing. This new RD does not move vertically like my old 6800, and you need very little slack in the housing where it approaches the mech. Once I shortened the housing and remounted it with the new cable, everything worked perfectly.

The RD-R8000 is a significant improvement over the 6800, which is a really good RD. The new one keeps better tension on the chain, especially on rough gravel, which results in better shifting. I have not yet tried it with the 28-12t cassette on my road wheels. I suspect I will have to back out the B screw and put on a shorter chain. This RD performs so well with the MTB cassette, I may just leave the 40t on my gravel wheels all the time.

Props to CC customer support for a little advice on tuning this new RD. It mounts and tunes a little differently from the old one.

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Tom H.

Tom H.wrote a review of on December 21, 2017

2 5

Familiarity: I returned this product before using it

These knickers are exactly like the Gore Element knickers but cost $40 more. They are both made of really thin lycra. They are not made of fleece or anything warm. The only difference is the name of the chamois. I have not ridden on either of them, but I have compared them side by side. Both chamois look exactly alike. Same thickness. Same surface. It's not like the expensive one has gel in it or anything special. It does have a fleece, Roubaix-type material panel at the front of the chamois, whereas the cheaper one just extends up the front like normal, but they're the same overall size and shape. I'm sending them back and keeping the cheaper ones. The Element pair fit a little better anyway. They are made in Romania. These are made in China. Maybe that's why. So why do these knickers cost $40 more? Thanks, Gore.

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Tom H.

Tom H.wrote a review of on November 16, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Granted, this is my first ever tubeless experience, having been a holdout for tubes, but man, what a difference. I live in the Southeast in an area where all the gravel is smooth, rounded wash gravel - no crushed limestone or flint. So I decided to prioritize lightness and suppleness over durability or flat protection. The Rambler fits the bill.

I bought the 40mm, 120 tpi, EXO version. They mounted easily to my Stan's Iron Cross rims without sealant, using only a floor pump, and held air overnight. They measure exactly 40mm mounted. Out of the box they weighed 369g and 375g. I weigh 155. My bike weighs 22 pounds. I run them at 28-30psi, and they are sublime. I added about 1.5 oz of Stan's Sealant per tire. I have several hundred miles on them without a single puncture, and I frequently ride past a landfill (in the dark) on a road strewn with roofing nails, broken glass and all manner of trash.

On rough surfaces like gravel, smooth equals fast, and these tires are fast. They roll over all the individual little rocks like a cloud drifting over hills. They are also comfortable, even on an 8-hour ride. The tread doesn't roll quite as smoothly on pavement as my old file tread Challenge Gravel Grinders, but that's a fair trade off for better traction on dirt. They are rock solid in gravel corners, on fast gravel descents and perform fairly well on loose gravel climbs. In deep mud, they grip about as well as an aggressively knobby cyclo-cross tire. (no spinning out) They're also reasonably good on single track trails, as long as the tree roots aren't too big, and the pine straw isn't too deep.

These are simply fast, comfortable, durable tires for gravel riding and racing. You can't go wrong.

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