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Steve

Steve

Wyoming

Steve

Stevewrote a review of on April 24, 2019

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

Haven't had a chance to really put some miles on them, but was worried about how they measured.

the 700x43 measures:
40.9mm wide at 60psi (max to seal them up)
41.9mm at 40psi (what I plan to ride)
Mounted on Mercury M1 rims (20mm) inner diameter, tubeless.

2 layers of Stans tape. With a compressor, getting the bead to settle in was easier than my other bikes, but too snug to set up with a floor pump.

On a Niner RLT Steel, there is plenty of clearance in the front and back.



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Steve

Stevewrote a review of on October 17, 2017

Once you go steel, you won't go back
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Truth be told, CC helped me build this bike up from the frame. So, this review is more on the niner frame than the build shown, but wanted to give Niner some respect. I race a Felt Carbon Road and Santa Cruz Carbon Highball. Since moving back to Wyoming, I needed something to lay down the gravel miles and race. A friend who builds recommended steel. Steel? So I settled for the Niner RLT Steel.

People describe steel has having a 'buttery' smooth ride. Maybe it's a combo of the 40cc tires, but it's so comfortable on road and gravel bumps that it begs to be ridden more. Smiles while punishing yourself? Yes. But, don't equate 'buttery' with 'floppy'. Steel is steel, and it's freakin' stiff. Your power goes direct to the tires. I can't wait for next summer's gravel race season. Race bike? Niner makes a carbon equivalent, but honestly I'll take the strength and comfort of steel and commit to training a bit harder. Those training miles are so pleasant. I'm finding myself doing road training miles on this bike more and more. It's a bit slower with 40cc tires, but heck, who cares when you're having fun.

I haven't weighed the bike yet, but with carbon seat post, cranks, Force cx1, Mercury wheels, I'd wager I'm right around 20-21lbs.

The frame (also on carbon) has dropouts for bike touring... which is nice, because the continental divide is on the bucket list. Reports say some of the rubber plugs fall out and are difficult to find replacements, but this is in no way structural, and mine are all still there.

The geometry is fantastic. 3 hours is comfortable. If you're hauling down some loose gravel you have to watch that rear tire. I don't race cx yet, but the wheelbase is reported to be a bit longer. I don't see why it wouldn't work.

Zane helped me get this set up. Everything my wife and I own is SRAM, so we did a CC custom build. The process was smooth, and the price was within budget. Would definitely go with a competitive cyclist build again. We included a Syntace carbon seatpost, zipp cockpit, Mercury wheels, Force cx1 groupo, mavic tires (orange seal is my go to sealant), and a Stages power meter.

After 2.5 months of summer/fall abuse, I highly recommend this frame. The build above looks awesome, and there is also a SRAM Apex build available as well. I'm a 1x guy, hence the custom build. Either way, custom or pre-built, give this bike some serious consideration!

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Steve

Stevewrote a review of on March 1, 2016

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Been running in Tucson, AZ for the past two years and shoes get eaten alive on the trail and mountains out here. So far, this is the longest lasting training shoe I've worn (Strava puts my current set at 459mi as of today), and it's easily got 50mi left.
The pros: It's a stout shoe. It's a great training shoe. Good forefoot protection. Good toe guards for rocky terrain. Very comfortable when broken in. Excellent on technical terrain, and excellent grip on slickrock and performs well in scree.
The cons: The first problem was the heel blister. I forefoot strike, and still had a big problem on the steeps until the shoe broke in. This was improved with slicker socks (UA heat gear/smartwool). The second, and not really a con, is the weight. These are not race weight, but they do last twice as long. It's also very noticeably a 6mm drop shoe, which again isn't a problem, but something to throw out there if you race in 4mm or less.
Just bought two more sets. Couldn't be happier. Wouldn't use them for backpacking as the heel box would probably cause a ton of blistering with heel lift, but it's a stout shoe for shoe-chewing terrain.

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Steve

Stevewrote a review of on October 28, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Awesome brakes, SRAM finally stepping up to the plate with these. Used to run the Elixers years ago and while they were good, Shimano beat them out. I was skeptical about these at first but I decided to give them a shot with my team deal and have been super impressed. I'm now 1200 miles in and love them. The reach adjust and easy contact adjust are nice features, and they modulate ultra well. My only complaint is the painful bleed experience... which was the same on the Elixer's.... but if you only bleed twice a year, then it's not a huge deal. I'm running 160/160 rotors on an XC bike... and would definitely go 180 or bigger up front if you did more downhill... although, that's not really a review for the brakes themselves :)

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Steve

Stevewrote a review of on July 23, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

A race feel mtb saddle that you can ride for hours? Yep. You can tell that Juliana put some time into making a "race" feel saddle with maximal comfort for women. Not the lightest on the market (but not the heaviest either), but grams go out the window when you realize you're still comfy 3 hours into a ride. Just picked one up for the roadie, too.

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Steve

Stevewrote a review of on April 28, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

They're burly and hold up to the rocks well, and SPD is my favorite cleat system for mnt riding and clears dirt/mud well. They're heavier than they look, so if you're looking to dump weight and save $$ get the SPD without the platform(my old set), or go up to the next level. However, the bike is still under 25lbs.

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