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Peter K.

Peter K.

Peter K.

Peter K.wrote a review of on March 19, 2019

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Got these hubs as part of a new wheel build and was wary about the extra weight. One ride into it I didn’t care about the weight. Engagement is instant but soft in a way—none of the “clunk” with engagement—and there really is something magical about bombing a long flowy descent with no freehub noise. And they’re beautiful. Seriously, just scroll past the weight and try these hubs. They’re amazing.

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Peter K.

Peter K.wrote a question about on October 20, 2018

I'm currently riding an Evil Insurgent, which I love, but I'm looking for a slightly shorter travel 29er with some better climbing ability, a steeper seat tube angle (I'm 6'2 and slack STAs add up), and maybe sacrificing a bit of descending performance for a better all-around ride. Sounds like this fits the bill but I'd be curious to hear from anyone who's ridden both.

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Peter K.

Peter K.wrote a question about on December 29, 2017

Quick question about sizing—this is my first CX bike, and I’m between sizes. I’ve owned a XL Nomad 3 and am currently on a size L Evil Insurgent with a 50mm stem—the Nomad always felt a little big but the Insurgent somehow feels perfect. My road bike is a Lynskey R230 size L with a 100mm stem. By my height and inseam the recommended size is the 60, but I’m concerned that would be too big. Any thoughts?

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Peter K.

Peter K.wrote a review of on September 26, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've been on my Insurgent for almost a year now, having come from a Nomad 3. When I made the switch my goal was to find something a little snappier/more fun but that could still do well on the gnar. The Insurgent definitely doesn't disappoint. Even with a coil the DELTA suspension keeps a fun factor that other designs don't have, and for a 6-inch travel bike I'm always impressed with how it likes to get off the ground even on smaller jumps and trail features. Some of that is lost in X-Low, but that's not what the X-Low setting is for. I don't use it much in regular trail use but the X-Low geometry is great for park riding and bigger DH. In the low setting, though, I'm impressed with how well it climbs. It's definitely not the super techy climber but at 6'2" I'm surprised at how well the front stays planted unless it's something really steep. My only gripe--and it's not enough to take off a star--is that I'd like to see some paint protection on the top of the rear triangle. The chainstays are very nicely protected by custom rubber, but some type of clear paint protection would be good on the stays, just because they take a bit of a beating being as low as they are.

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Peter K.

Peter K.wrote a review of on October 31, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

This is a great tire that fills an important gap between semi-slicks like the Schwalbe Rock Razor and the knobbier, slower-rolling options.

Mounting the new DoubleDown casing was quite a bit easier than Schwalbe's Super Gravity line. I had no problems setting up tubeless with a crappy floor pump and Stan's sealant.

The ride is really impressive. I was expecting to lose some climbing traction as with the Rock Razor, but this tire actually has an impressive amount of grip. The funny-looking side knobs definitely do their job, too. I was impressed with the cornering of this tire, and it didn't feel like I had to lean in quite as aggressively as with a Rock Razor to get the side knobs to hook up. The stiffer DD casing probably helps a bit in this department too.

The Tomahawk rolls fast, and honestly I couldn't feel a big speed difference vs Rock Razor, though the RR is probably a touch faster.

This has quickly become my new favorite rear tire, and it pairs beautifully with a 2.4 High Roller II up front. I don't think I'll be going back to Schwalbe any time soon--great tires, but fast-wearing and not worth the extra cost vs these.

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Peter K.

Peter K.wrote a review of on December 15, 2014

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I was on the fence about buying a Nomad for enduro racing, the occasional park days, and general AM/TR riding in the Pacific Northwest, and I'm so glad I went for it. This bike is truly amazing.

It really does climb well for what it is. Yeah, it's a little cumbersome on super tight singletrack, but it's far more usable than the 65-degree head angle would let on. I'm consistently surprised at how maneuverable it is. Long sustained non-techy climbs are a breeze, especially with a shock like the Monarch or the Cane Creek DBAir CS in climb mode.

But don't get this bike to go slow. Get it because no matter what drop, gap, jump, rock garden, or other assorted gnar you want to send this thing through, it will absolutely eat it up. It truly rides better the faster you go. It's pretty amazing. So fast, so forgiving.

You may hear a lot about how you need to be "on the front" of the bike and always riding aggressively--not really. What IS true is that you need to be riding in the center of the bike, which is a little further forward due to the long front center of the bike. Sit back and the rear shock will compress, the head tube will slacken, and the front wheel will unweight a little. Yeah, then it doesn't handle so great. Find the middle and the ride is beautiful.

After a couple months on all kinds of trails, I can say this is definitely a beast of a bike that will handle anything you throw at it. If enduro racing and park days are in your future, look no further. If low-speed techy singletrack is your thing, the Nomad is probably the wrong bike.

Seriously, this thing rips. And the sales and support from Competitive Cyclist are, as always, second to none. I went with the XX1/ENVE M70/Fox 36 build and added a DBAir CS. It's insane.

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