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Matt E.

Matt E.

Matt E.

Matt E.wrote a review of on January 30, 2018

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Like pretty much everyone I suspect who uses the Zero cleats and has to put down their foot a lot due to lights/stops and then pushes off a bit to get going my only gripe with them was wearing off the metal and screws and having to purchase a whole new set of cleats because of one area of damage.

These seemed a perfect antidote. Carrying around the plugs was never something I was going to do; so I have no comment on them. My experience with the yellow surrounding shield parallels all the negative comments on this review thread. They squeaked on climbs and the one on the 'push off' foot disappeared on the second ride.

So why would I cheerfully by these cleats again? Because even w/o the bumper feature they're a big improvement. Discarding the bumpers gives you a lower profile cleat so you CAN walk more easily, not well, but better than the older design. But the main reason to pay extra for these is that the steel cover plate is MUCH tougher than the 'standard' version and its shape does a much better job of protecting the screws. Regardless of the bumper feature, for an extra $15 this are a better value.

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Matt E.

Matt E.wrote a review of on January 30, 2016

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I got these expecting them to be the rough equivalent of the manufacturer's Tricomp tires I'd used in the past. I was using Veloflex Corsa's 25 mm tires at the time and as nifty as those tires rolled and cornered; they did get their shares of flats. I figured I'd give up some tpi and an ounce weight at the rim (I got these in 23mm) and deal with the decrease in feel in return for fewer punctures. The 'surprise' was how good these tires were. Really, other than a bit more audible rolling noise (if you're lucky enough to be riding somewhere that's dead quiet), I can't notice a difference in riding feel between the brands despite the tpi difference. The Vredestein's are easier to seat on the rim and, at least for me, grip better in corners. There are corners on certain descents that I'd lost my nerve on and was braking going into (just getting old), but the Senso's grip so well that as long as everything is clear and dry I feel confident enough to throw caution to the wind now and again.

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Matt E.

Matt E.wrote a review of on July 15, 2014

5 5

I got this because I wanted to try a jersey that was closer to skin tight than the Capo jerseys I usually get. Following Castelli's sizing chart for a large, I got my wish. But, despite being tight enough to sometimes leave seam marks on my shoulders after a ride ... the jersey is really just as comfortable as the Capos, has a better zipper, and does seem to catch less wind at 20+ mph. The pleasant surprise was that at least for me, it is more comfortable to ride this 'tight' jersey in 85F or above weather (especially up hills). I guess the sweat goes right to the fabric and evaporates rather than covering you and staying there while the fabric is actually a bit away from your body.

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Matt E.

Matt E.wrote a review of on July 15, 2014

2 5

Like the previous reviewer, my experience was that the leg grippers (which are glued to the lycra, not sewn) came off after the third washing. Doesn't mean Castelli's stuff is 'bad', I love their jerseys and maybe their other shorts are great, but this model might be best passed on. Oh, I was just into the large on their sizing chart, but found a large to be snug, about the same as Pearl Izumi medium.

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