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Jon J

Jon J

Salt Lake City

Jon J's Passions

Snow Skiing
Road Biking
Mountain Biking

Jon J's Bio

I grew up on Colorado's Front Range, and have now spent extended time in Wyoming and Utah as well. Salt Lakes 4K elevation is the lowest I've ever lived at.
After me knees had had enough of running competitively in college, I transitioned to XC mtn bike racing. A great cardiovascular system and lower leg strength made the transition very easy. Now a days with a family I race less, but like to get out for a ride any chance I get. I'm the Yeti Cycles brand ambassador here at Competitive, and have ridden Yeti's for over 10 years now. I'm currently loving my SB45 and am happy to answer any questions regarding all things Yeti.


“FOLLOW” ME FOR REVIEWS ON CYCLING GEAR & DON'T HESITATE TO CALL FOR ALL YOUR GEAR QUESTIONS AND NEEDS AT (801-736-6396) EXT. 4378 OR EMAIL ME AT JJAKUPCAK@BACKCOUNTRY.COM


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Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on December 17, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I initially was only after the cassette pliers and BB/cassette tool, but after surveying my tool box, everything in my mis-mash of tools could use an update. The Team Edition kit had damn near everything you'd need to build a bike short of a headset press and a torque wrench. I find myself using the aforementioned cassette pliers and BB/Locking wrench the most, and cassette swaps now take half the time, and none of the profanity my old chain whip setup required.
The valve core tool has been a nice surprise as well, not that fishing for the little plastic "C" bit that came with my valve stems was hard, but now there is a solid tool in it's place for needed occasions. The leather case keeps everything in is spot, and hangs easily from my Sport Repair stand, and zips up just as easy for weekend trips. Buy it for the tools you need the most, but enjoy the benefit of the tools you didn't know you needed.

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Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on October 1, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

Got this for my wife for a recent trip to southern Utah. She wore it Friday, and I believe finally took it off once we got home Sunday. Monday morning I had to order the other color. She's 5'4", 120lbs, and the XS fits her great. The material is soft, and breathes well. The two rear pockets are her favorite feature, and keep items snug and secure.

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Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on September 19, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

Having ridden my SB100 all spring, and taking out the SB150 previously, I was ready to see if the SB130 fit accordingly into Yeti's 2019 lineup. 5 minutes into my first ride, I had my answer.
As with the 150, I rode a medium. Again, at 5'8" the medium fit well despite the longer reach number thanks to the new steeper seat tube angle. My wife is 5'4", and she also rode the medium comfortably. The stock X01 Race build weighed in at 29.7lbs with pedals and a bottle cage, just under a pound lighter than the SB150. Where the SB150 pedaled and felt like a 30lb bike, the SB130 had a much lighter a snappier feel given the weight. Just a few pedals strokes into the initial climb from the parking lot I felt like I could race a weekly XC race on this bike with lighter wheels and tires. All the power seems to go straight from the pedals to the rear wheel.
The SB130 was the most playful Yeti 29er I've ridden. It eagerly hopped off any rock, root, or lip I came across. On one of the more technical rocky trails in the area, it floated over the chunder where the SB150 preferred to plow through.
I even spent a morning riding the lifts of Deer Valley on the SB130. Again, the bike didn't feel out of it's element. Did I ride some of the lines faster on the 150? Yes, but I wasn't crawling down by any means, and the bike in some instances was easier to lift up on some of the slower speed corner drops I encountered.
I'd take the SB130 as the best "do it all" bike in the 2019 SB lineup, more capable than the SB100, but snappier than the SB150.

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Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on September 17, 2018

Light, Comfortable, Awesome
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I wanted to wait and put these bibs through the paces before submitting a review. After numerous 3 hour plus rides, the NX-G bibs have become a go to in a drawer full of Assos bibs.
At 5'8", 145lbs, I wear a medium in the NX-Gs, the compression is just that, gradual, and fit doesn’t seem any different other non-compression bibs I have. The leg material is lighter than that of my Assos Equipe EVOs, and the upper is made of an almost mesh like fabric that breathes amazingly, but isn’t chill inducing on a morning descent. The Cirro S chamois has a smaller footprint than the Assos I’ve considered the industry standard, but equals it in comfort. The most important feature for me on bibs is a relieved front section to keep everything in place, rather than a flat front and seam, and the NX-G bibs check that box as well. I’d put these bibs up against any top level price point from any manufacturer, and bibs are one item where higher cost does equate to a better experience.

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Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on September 11, 2018

No need for lines
5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

Looking at the SB150 on paper, my first thought was "That's a big bike"€. When their sizing listed a range of 5'7" to 5'11"€, I thought there must have been a mistake. An 18.1"€ reach was way more than I've typically ridden. How could that be? A 77 degree seat tube angle is how. I took our medium demo SB150 out for a 3 day weekend to check the fit and function of the big new Super Bike.
I'm 5'8", and have been riding a medium SB100 since May, and owned a small SB4.5 prior to that. I've always been between small and medium with most brands, and have found I can comfortably ride each size with just a change in stem length. Getting the bike setup, with my 31" inseam, I still have about an inch of the 150mm Transfer's base post exposed above the seat tube clamp. The stock X01 Eagle Race bike comes with a 40mm stem, so things felt good from a reach standpoint. With pedals the bike weighed in at 30.5lbs.
I setup the suspension just slightly softer than Yeti's recommendation for my weight (their new site setup guide is pretty slick). Yeti's SI suspension has always felt well rounded and sits atop industry offerings in my opinion. I find I get the desired small bump sensitivity and unquestioned power transfer when pedaling all while keep the shock in the open setting. The SB150 was no different.
My first ride was a quick 5 mile loop with a steep climbing featuring some tight switchbacks and a familiar rocky descent. Pedaling up, the SI link performed as expected, no noticeable bob from pedaling, even under harder efforts, and the shock only moved to aid in traction. I've found on my other Yetis that I can scramble up damn near anything with a consistent cadence. The suspension absorbs obstacles and maintains great traction. I've never felt a harsh buck, and the bike just seems to claw its way through chunder. The 65.5 head angle was felt on the tight turns, but I cleaned them all taking an anticipated wider line. It was in those turns that I questioned if the small would even be a possibility, as real estate got tight between me legs and the turned bars. The biggest difference I noticed going up was the 6lb difference in weight of the bike compared to my SB100. My time up the climb was middling compared to other efforts, but this bike is built to get down fast, not up.
Speaking of getting down, this bike does just that. I pointed the SB150 down the familiar trail, but intentionally through my known lines out the window, and just smashed the straight line as much as possible. The bike soaked it all up, and I ended up smashing a little too much, having to nurse a small puncture on the rear Aggressor tire home. Even taking in gingerly down the last bit, my time was the 2nd fastest I'd done for the segment. The bike was so composed and stable, I was surprised by the result. Thankfully the Stans did it's job, and the bike was ready to roll to the lifts and take on some jumps and big rocks at Deer Valley the next day.
I'd spent another day at Deer Valley riding the Pivot Firebird 29, so it was great to compare the bikes on similar trails. While the Pivot was a small, and the Yeti was medium, I didn't feel the longer wheelbase of the Yeti in the tight, rooty, drops that litter the trails. Flow trails aren't my jam, but the small segments I did ride revealed composed cornering, and the plush feel you'd expect of a 150mm X2. As with the Pivot, I was left wishing for faster, wide open, chunky terrain on the SB150, but the bike handled the steep, sudden drops of the Deer Valley trails with ease. While I didn't pedal the Firebird as much as the SB150, the Yeti did feel more composed and efficient on the same brief climb.
The final day I did what I would consider a "normal ride" for me, and

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Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on August 5, 2018

Hundo
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

The SB100 is the race ready bike, that can still let loose and party. That should probably be reversed, the SB100 is the party bike that can still plop you on top of the podium. I snagged a SB100 X01 Race complete, and dressed it up with Enve bar, stem, M525 wheels, and some Next SL G4 cranks. With some race minded XC tires (Forekaster front/Aspen rear), she weighed in at 24.5lbs with pedals and a dropper. Not the lightest bike I've owned. My ASR, which the SB100 essentially replaces, was 22.3lbs with a rigid post. That said their are light bikes, and there are bikes that pedal light, and the SB100 is all go. I've PR'd on climbs without trying, and its still a Yeti, so the downhill chops come stock. This bike has replaced my SB4.5.

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Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on July 31, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

This bike had me at 170mm 29er fork. I got to spend a day on this at Deer Valley. While it was night to hop on the lift to get up the hill, I did give into sadomasochism and pedaled up some hills as well. The bike climbs like a big travel bike would, but the DW link remains efficient, it's just on a really big bike now.
After a easy "feel out" run, I immediately pointed the bike down the Double Black diamond single-track that would normally be way over my head. What I found out was that it's hard to get in over your head with 29" wheels, a 170mm fork, 160mm or rear travel, and a dropper post. Drops, roots, rock gardens, come what may, this bike handled it all. The scariest part was the few time my own rear end almost got sucked in between the rear tire and the seatpost. I'm 5'8", and was right at home on a small Firebird 29. For what this bike it, it handled Deer Valley's tight, rooted, turns as well as any bike I've been on. If only there had been some wide open, chunky, high speed terrain, I'm sure I'd still be grinning ear to ear.

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Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on July 21, 2018

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

Spent a day on the lifts with these, and had no complaints. They're sturdier than a Fox Enduro of a Troy Lee Speed, but less than a hard shell pad, or even some of the beefier gel/dough pads like the VPDs or Troy Lee 5450s.
I was right between small and medium, and gave the smalls a whirl. They were snug at first, but never uncomfortably tight while riding. I have bigger calves, so I had to pull the bottom up some, but even that bunching didn't cause issues. Super packable, and could be carried and put on at the top before ripping back down. If you're getting super sendy, I'd look at a burlier option like the Project or the Flex.

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Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on July 21, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Standard butyl tube. Offered in many widths and valve stem lengths. Removable valve cores make it easy to add some sealant in the tube to help with flat prevention. If you're not counting every gram, there is no reason to go with another tube.

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