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Dianoda

Dianoda

Dianoda

Dianodawrote a review of on July 20, 2012

5 5

It doesn't get much lighter than this, and these bars are pretty darn stiff, too. Admittedly, the Ergosum LTD does have maybe a bit more flex in it at the very tips compared to the 7000 series aluminum bar that came stock on my Fuji, but I can forgive that because it weighs about 120g less. And I can't really notice any difference in stiffness in the drops, which is where I spend most of my time anyways. Being carbon, it does ride noticeably smoother.

If I was doing it all over again, I'd probably opt for the team edition over the LTD - weight is about 25g more, but you gain the option of mounting clip-ons (ie, tri-bars, etc.), and the price is slightly more reasonable.

All in all, there really isn't anything wrong with the ergosum LTD, and I love the shape of the drop - fairly shallow, but ergonomic. It's a great bar if you typically ride in an aggressive position and want weight as low as possible. But the trade off for not being about to mount tri-bars is a small mark against it IMO, as is the normally sky high asking price (on that note, thanks, bonktown/chainlove!). It looks great, too - I almost feel bad about covering that glossy carbon finish with bar tape.

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Dianoda

Dianodawrote a review of on April 20, 2012

4 5

I have nothing bad to say about this fork - and that's a wonderful thing.

I upgraded to this fork for two reasons - the great price from bonktown and the weight - cut down it's about 300g lighter than my old fork (which was a carbon/aluminum mix with aluminum steer tube) - that's quite a bit of weight to drop for a single component swap. Uncut weight was close to spec - pretty sure mine came in at 493g.

I haven't noticed any brake shudder, but I haven't had a chance to ride hard on this fork yet. Turn in does take noticeably less effort compared to my old fork, and the carbon transmits less vibration - the bike just rides smoother.

Now I just need to do something about the heavy wheels that came with my cross bike and she'll be closing in on 18lb for the whole setup - small problem: the race wheelset I have my eye on costs megabucks compared to what I paid for this fork...

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Dianoda

Dianodawrote a review of on March 27, 2012

5 5

Takes the mystery out of tightening down your fancy bike bits and the included 4/5/6mm hex heads should be all you need to take care of 90% of the screws on most bikes. As soon as I got it out of the package I re-tensioned all the relevant fancy bits of my bike and the cleats to my carbon-soled road shoes. The wrench works like a charm, fits nicely in hand, and was a great deal off bonktown.

One caveat - I did manage to destroy a set of supposedly 7000 series aluminum screws with this wrench while installing a CF bottle cage. Given the nature of the failure - the heads of each screw simultaneously popped off while I was tightening one down at or near the 5NM limit - I think it has a lot more to do with cheap screws and less with this wrench - so go nuts, just try not to lose sight of common sense (for example, bottle cages don't need to be crazy tight).

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Dianoda

Dianodawrote a review of on February 28, 2012

5 5

First off, a few things: I'm not exactly a roadie - yet. But I am an avid biker, tweaker, ultralight backpacker, swimmer, rock climber, and soon to be triathlete. I also live in Chicagoland, which is mostly flat and filled with a seemingly endless amount of bike paths and trails, some paved, some fine gravel, some packed earth. For exploring those trails, a cyclecross bike is the ideal compromise.

So yes, the Fuji Cross Pro is somewhat of a jack-of-all-trades, with great looks and is a killer value at sale prices. It's not my MTB, nor is it hopelessly lost on semi-crappy trail. It's not an ideal road bike, but it's definitely built for speed (well, the 46/36 crank isn't exactly the best option for top end speed...). The tires are skinny enough that you reap the benefits of lower rolling resistance. The SRAM Rival shifting components have been great so far - shifting is crisp and fast. The bike feels very stable at speed and handles well. The redundant top break levers are useful if things get hairy and you're someone coming to the Fuji from a MTB.

And it is light, oh so light - my main ride for the past decade was a '98 Schwinn Frontier GS MTB - which proved itself to be a decent ride, cheap, built to handle plenty of abuse, but very heavy for a fixed suspension bike (steel frame, and it weighs at least 15lbs more than the Fuji). A friend suggested my joining him for a few sprint/oly triathlons this upcoming season, and the Schwinn was never going to be anywhere close to competitive. But the Fuji is a swapped set of road rubber and a 53/39 crankset away from being a serviceable bike. I'm also about 90% sure that I'll be picking up a new wheelset/cassette as well - I'd like something a bit more race worthy for the wheels, but mostly because swapping tires is a pain (but swapping wheels takes about a minute when you have a cassette installed on both wheelsets).

I bought this bike off BT - the same people prep the bikes whether you buy from realcyclist or BT, putting it together after pulling the kit out of the box was a piece of cake.

One last note about sizing - I'm 5'8", 30" inseam and the 54cm model feels just right.

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