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Dana R.

Dana R.

East Baldwin, ME

Dana R.'s Passions

Road Biking

Dana R.'s Bio

Photographer, cyclist and hiker

Dana R.

Dana R.wrote a review of on July 23, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I've tried out a lot of seat bags over the years, and this has been the best by far. I don't ride tubulars (no point), so this holds two tubes, a big-ass multi-tool, CO2 chuck w/ 2 cartridges, 2 tire levers, a couple of tire boots, spare chain link, house keys, and still a little extra room if I want (there's 2 side zip compartments for money/license/etc that I haven't used yet). Most importantly, there is no velcro wrapped around the seatpost to chafe my spandex, and the pack sits firmly in place. I've been using it for about a month, and wished I had learned about this bag before now.

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Dana R.

Dana R.wrote a review of on March 5, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I bought one to try out on sale, and loved it so much I bought 4 more. I've worn it in temps ranging from the low 40's into the upper 60's, and with proper layering, is an extremely versatile garment. I generally wear a Castelli windstopper short sleeve baselayer under it in temps under 55-58 degrees, and if it gets really cool (low/mid 40's), I'll wear a lightly insulated vest over the top of those two layers. The arms get a bit cold under 50, but I find this also helps to regulate my body temp as well and I tend to not overheat as much. The jersey (I don't really consider it a "jacket") is extremely comfortable, and fits me well....the rear pockets are large and easily accessible. I got caught out in the rain in 47-48 degree temps with just this jersey on with the Castelli base layer underneath, and was actually fairly comfortable - my legs, not so much, as I had left my knee warmers at home, but the jersey still insulated very well when it was soaked. I actually look forward now to riding in the cooler temps with this jersey.

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Dana R.

Dana R.wrote a review of on February 2, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

After covering my hands with grease and solvent countless times over the years, I finally bought a box of these gloves. In the past, I tried using the medical-type latex glove, but they are way too thin to last longer than a few minutes (and forget it if you get any degreaser on them). The Park gloves work very well and are heavy duty....and I like the fact that if I have to grab something that I don't want to get grease all over, I can easily wipe them off with a paper towel. I clean my bikes fairly often (every 2-3 weeks) which includes completely disassembling my drivetrain, and now that I have been using these gloves, they are a must-have. Kind of pricey, but they should last awhile....plus you can re-use them if you want.

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Dana R.

Dana R.wrote a review of on February 2, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've used all kinds of bars over the years, including the anatomic-types, which I generally dislike. These bars are the most comfortable I've used, and between the shallow drop and short reach, are perfect for me. I normally ride a 42cm bar, but bought these in a 44cm since the tops are 42cm and they flare out to 44cm at the drops. Not the lightest bars on the market, but who cares.

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Dana R.

Dana R.wrote a review of on January 3, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've used quite a few helmets over the years....and notably the Giro Atmos II for the past 10 years or so. I've had two crashes with the Atmos - first one I hit pavement at around 23 mph and got a concussion. Second one was getting hit by a car nearly head-on, and no concussion (although my side/shoulder seemed to take the brunt of the hit into the windshield). I always hated the buckle/retention system of the Atmos II, but it was lightweight, vented well and looked cool.

A little over a month ago, I decided my current Atmos II needed a replacement as the shell was starting to separate from the foam core, so I ordered the POC - I had been eyeing the POC, but at full retail, it was a bit pricey....got it on sale, and that was much more manageable. My first impression was that the helmet was pretty big - however, I was surprised at how light it was. It took me no time to dial in the fit to my head, and the straps/retention system is infinitely better than the Giro.

I've been using the helmet for a little over a month and around 800 miles, and I often say to myself

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Dana R.

Dana R.wrote a review of on December 5, 2016

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I was previously using a big and bulky Topeak bag - it could fit a ton of stuff in it, but was huge and flopped around a lot. While the medium sized Lizard Skins bag is much smaller, the fit is WAY better on my bike. Right now, I can fit the following contents:

1 large multitool (with chain breaker)
2 tire levers
1 spare tube (Continental Race Lite)
1 tire patch kit
3 Park tire boots
1 SRAM master link
House keys

With all of that in it, there's really nothing else going it it, except maybe some money or something. The fit on my bike is perfect, and extremely solid. I'm kind of bummed that I couldn't fit 2 tubes in it, but the patch kit should suffice in the event I get a second flat on the same ride. I would buy this again in a heartbeat.

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Dana R.

Dana R.wrote a review of on December 3, 2016

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I've used everything from cheap shorts to $400+ Assos bibs.....and while I love my Assos bibs, for the price, these Capo bibs cannot be beat - at least for my body....your mileage may vary. I've had people rave about Castelli Rosso Corsa line bibs, and I can't ride those more than 30-60 minutes without wanting to rip them off my body as the chamois is so uncomfortable and digs into me. My first experience with Capo was from a Gran Fondo kit I had purchased - and while those bibs are lower quality than these ones here, I was amazed at how comfortable the chamois was. I initially bought 1 pair on sale to test out since my daily beater bibs are getting a bit worn....and then bought 4 more pairs of these. These bibs are a steal at the sale price.

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Dana R.

Dana R.wrote a review of on November 27, 2016

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I originally bought one to try out - I now own five. The recommended temp range is 57-68 degrees, and that is pretty much spot on with just a short sleeve jersey.....and also arm warmers if it's below 65 and/or windy/cloudy. I haven't had to ride in temps below 57 yet (yay SoCal), but for high 40's/low 50's, I would throw on a vest in addition to this base layer.....which beats wearing a jacket. The material itself feels a little flimsy, so let's hope it holds up.....but other than that, they knocked it out of the park with this shirt.

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Dana R.

Dana R.wrote a review of on May 23, 2016

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I have been riding road bikes since the late 1980's, and have ridden every material except titanium (although with any luck, will be ordering a Firefly Ti bike). I built up the Fenix SL frame/fork with full Dura Ace 9000, Thomson X2 stem and Masterpiece post, HED Belgium C2 rims (24 front / 28 rear) with Chris King R45 hubs and Vittoria Rubino Pro day-to-day tires (and latex tubes), 3T ergonova aluminum bars, Specialized Toupe Pro seat and Garmin Vector 2 pedals. It is definitely not the lightest bike I've ever owned, but it is by FAR the most comfortable. It is stiff, but forgiving - although the rim and tire/tube combo help with this as well.

I've put a few hundred miles on the bike and the only downside (to me) is that the bike doesn't have the quickest handling in the world. I personally like bikes that are "twitchy"....and this isn't one of them. To somewhat put it in context, it's like comparing a BMW M5 (Ridley) to a Porsche Cayman GT4 (purpose-built "high speed" racing bike) - the M5 will outclass and outcomfort the GT4, especially for the long haul, but the GT4 will outhandle it any day of the week.

Now, that's not to say that the Fenix SL doesn't handle well and is incapable; I'm just comparing it to a full-on crit machine that you can effortlessly dive into corners with. You can do that with the Ridley as well, it just takes a little more forethought. Your mileage may vary. On a recent mountain descent on some rather poor roads, I found myself on the brakes much more than I would be with previous bikes I've ridden/owned.

But the comfort - oh man. This is a bike that you want to keep riding. It's stiff where it needs to be, and yet surprisingly compliant.....but doesn't feel totally "dead" like some other carbon bikes I've owned.

A word about the Dura Ace 9000 mechanical groupset - holy crap. I rode Shimano in the 1990's through to the mid 2000's, and used Ultegra back then - a very capable groupset that shifted flawlessly. I then went to SRAM back in 2007 for my race, bike since it was light and cheap.....if I killed it, it would be much cheaper to replace. I've been using SRAM right up until this spring, but grew tired of the crummy feel of the shifting. Between the brakes, crankset and the effortless mechanical shifting (including the front derailleur), Shimano knocked it out of the park with the D/A 9000 groupset. I will never go back to SRAM.

Oh, I almost forgot - the Fenix SL frame/fork appear to be made in China. I was rather disappointed by this as I was under the impression that Ridley made all of their stuff in Belgium, but this doesn't seem to be the case. Either way, the frame and fork appear to be well constructed and with good tolerances.

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