Free 2-Day Shipping on Orders Over $50 100% Guaranteed Returns
1-888-276-7130
2018 Road Bike Buyer’s Guide
Connor Johnson

Connor Johnson

Salt Lake City, Utah

Connor Johnson's Bio

Howdy! I am an Expert Gearhead who specializes in skiing (resort & backcountry touring, I don't discriminate in my powder hounding), mountain biking, hiking & camping. When I'm not getting lost in the woods, you'll catch me tinkering with my bikes, snappin' photos, and eating burritos.

All of the photos in my reviews are either my own or one's that friends have shot of me enjoying the gear! Check out my latest adventures on my Instagram @connorjuliusjohnson

For any gear questions or adventure advice, give a shout to cojohnson@backcountry.com or call me at 801.204.4547

Connor Johnson

Connor Johnsonwrote a review of on June 18, 2018

Decent Trail Pads
4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I got these in a size L and they fit decent. Maybe a bit on the bigger side, I possibly could have gone for a medium for when they get stretched out after some use on the trail. For reference, the widest part of my calf measures to be 15" and thighs are 20".

All in all, they do a great job fitting when just casually wearing them and actively riding with them. They pedal great and feel pretty protective. The padded knee portion feels like it would do a good job to protect your knee in a crash, at least from shredding your skin. They're a soft feel and the rubber strip does a good job of keeping the pads where they should be, but a top strap wouldn't be a bad thing to have.

The material isn't neoprene, but sort of feels like it. Its pretty hot for a daily knee pad for the summer - its great when its a bit cooler weather (think spring or fall riding), but definitely warm.

I've used it for both day to day use trail riding (3000+ ft of climbing days) and DH days (Angel Fire bike park in the photo below). Its protective, but wouldn't mind having something a touch beefier for the latter, but for what they are they absolutely crush it. Its a jack of all trades sort of knee pad.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Connor Johnson

Connor Johnsonwrote a review of on May 4, 2018

Bicycle Bell Clickbait!
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Hello, welcome to my Spur Cycle bell review! You're probably scanning reviews, wondering how a bell can cost $50-60 dollars! I too, was a non believer, but am here to spread the good ding of the Spur Cycle Bell!

If you live in an area with high traffic (or remote and you want to keep away those scary bears), a bell is a great idea on a bike. My requirements were wanting one that was relatively subtle looking, was louder than an screaming infant, and could get used and abused on the trail and not instantly explode. Lets go through these to see how it fairs.

Low key looking: check. Its a bit more obvious than something like the Knog bells, but I had one that style that pretty instantly fell apart after one of the springs came out.

Loud Factor: DING DING (shout this out loud and will be close to as loud as this bell is). Yes, and it has a lovely after ring.

It has been through considerably more use than other my bells have and still truckin' along. Its easy to install and I've now bought them for literally all of my bikes.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Connor Johnson

Connor Johnsonwrote a review of on April 30, 2018

Solid Saddle
4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I threw this on my Niner Sir 9 and its treated me well. I honestly don't remember exactly my sitbone width so I just went with the medium and it fits fine. Hardtails can be rough on the behind after a fair amount of mileage, but had no issues with this!

I have noticed a bit of wear and tear on the left side, which is a bit of a bummer. I'm guessing its from putting it down on the left side, though there is a chance of it coming from the occasional crash (I'm only human, ok?!)

Vanity aside, I like the matchy matchy of being able to match my saddle with my Ergon grips.

If you're looking for a good trail saddle, look no further! Feel free to reach out if you do have any other questions on it and I'd be happy to help!

(0)

 

0 Comments

Connor Johnson

Connor Johnsonwrote a review of on April 30, 2018

No Bull, Just A Workhorse Dropper
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I have this mounted up on my Niner Sir 9 - I managed to squeeze a 170mm post on it and it essentially has turned it into a full on rowdy trail hardtail. Its awesome.

- My initial dropper I bought essentially didn't work. Bummer. I hit up PNW Component's warranty dept and the founder personally reached out to me and got me another sent out pronto. Pretty rad.

Since then, zero issues. Works flawlessly. Though they did include a 1x style lever with it, I had an anodized Raceface Turbine remote lever that I use with it.

If you're looking for a bomber dropper lever that is 150mm or bigger and comes with a lever, look no further! Pretty awesome post - if you have any other questions on it or are interested this dropper for your bike, feel free to reach out and I'd be happy to help!

(0)

 

0 Comments

Connor Johnson

Connor Johnsonwrote a review of on April 30, 2018

Heavy Metal Trail Hardtail
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I am 5'11" and have a 32" inseam. I went with a size large frame and it fits great. I built mine up from the frame up (Deity cockpit, Ergon saddle & grips, PNW Components Bachelor Dropper, Rockshox Pike 130mm, GX Eagle drivetrain, and Guide RSC brakes) and it has been so fun. I've ran it with both 29" wheels (pictured here) and 27.5+ wheels - I personally prefer 27.5+ hands down. Its not that light, in fact I like to call it Heavy Metal!! (Insert rock hands here)

What I like about it:
- Pretty capable for a hardtail. I absolutely smash down rowdy trails and it can hold its own! Generally not as fast as a full squish bike, but its a steel hardtail that is a blast to ride. Not sure if its the steel frame or not, but it holds its own for sure. I definitely felt that the 27.5+ were more confidence inspiring on the downhill - better traction and feels like it lowers the bottom bracket a bit.
- Short chainstays make for a snappy bike, just pretty playful in general.
- Reynolds 853 Steel frame gives a lively feel on the trail. I would love to try a direct comparison of a non steel version (I know this doesn't exist) but does have a springy feel that is just fun to ride.

What I don't like:
- While I wasn't entirely concerned about the weight, it really is not a light bike (again, Heavy Metal). I think mine weighs in at 31-32ish lbs with my Crank Brother stamp pedals.
- Niner says it should fit 29" tires that are up to 2.5" depending on brand - a Schwalbe 2.35" Nobby Nic mounted on Industry Nine Trail 245 wheels practically do not fit and rubs on hard cornering. Seriously millimeters of clearance. For having Niner as a name and barely fitting a pretty normal size tire on not that wide of rims is a bit weak. No issue with plus size tires though!

If you're looking for a hardtail and are more concerned about having a rad time out on the trail than bother counting grams, this could be the bike for you! Feel free to reach out if you do have any questions on it or if you'd like any help putting together a custom build for yourself!

(0)

 

0 Comments

Connor Johnson

Connor Johnsonwrote a review of on April 19, 2018

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

Posting from an email from a customer who bought the size XXL:

I ended up with the XXL Gore gloves when my size by measurement was large. The xxl's fit perfectly. Probably good information for you to know for the gore gloves. I love Gore equipment but that's a drag if they're fit is that off. Anyway bottom line I'm happy.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Connor Johnson

Connor Johnsonwrote a review of on February 14, 2018

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I'm 5'11" and 175lbs and often split between medium and large in terms of sizing. I decided to buy both to try them out and see which fit best - large was hands down the way to go in this case. It fit well - not snug, not loose. A perfect, athletic fit.

What I like about the jacket:
- The hood fits over a bike helmet. Rainy day? No problem. Throw up the hood and you're set.
- Goretex Paclite is waterproof and packs down tiny enough to fit into a pack or even, gasp, a fanny pack. Fantastic emergency shell for the trail! I haven't fully put it through the ringer to talk durability. Will report back on it.
- I like that you can cinch down the bottom of the jacket and the hood.

What I Don't Like:
- I guess lack of pockets, not a huge fan of rear pockets like it has. With that said, I don't really mind as its more of an emergency style shell or can wear a pack.
- I do slightly worry the lack of venting may lead to overheating, but will cross that bridge when I come to it.

If you need a good trail jacket for wet weather that also packs down pretty small, look no further! If you have any questions on sizing or if you're looking to place an order, feel free to reach me at my direct line 801.204.4547 or email cojohnson@backcountry.com and would be happy to help!

(0)

 

0 Comments

Connor Johnson

Connor Johnsonwrote a review of on February 7, 2018

4 5

Familiarity: I returned this product before using it

Sick of having frozen digits when I returned home after rides in late fall/winter/early spring, I picked these up among a few other pairs of windproof / winter gloves to ride my mountain bike when the weather gets nasty. These were my close second choice of glove. I typically wear mediums (I bought mediums) and have a 7 3/4" length from finger tip to wrist length and 9" circumference at the widest part of the palm.

They're relatively warm, without being overly insulated or bulky. This was a big factor for me - I like my MTB gloves pretty tight so I can get a decent grip on the bars. These are pretty good about it, with the exception of the pinky being too long.

The Gore Windstopper I would expect to have done wonders. I have other ski touring gloves that have Windstopper that are fantastic and breath well in high aerobic activity and would have expected this to have been no exception. I also liked the build of the palm and the elastic bits on the fingertips.

If you're in need of a new pair of gloves for cold weather commuting, cyclocross, or mountain biking (road too I suppose), these are a fantastic option. Feel free to reach me at my direct line 801.204.4547 or my email cojohnson@backcountry.com

(1)

 

0 Comments

0 Comments

0 Comments

Connor Johnson

Connor Johnsonwrote a review of on November 29, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Bleed a man's brakes, he'll have stopping power for a bit, teach a man to bleed his brakes, he'll have stopping power forever. For the cost of bring your bike to a shop to have them bled a single time, you could pick this up and learn to do it yourself.

Literally everything you need to bleed them, its not hard to do. I'm an intermediate, self taught mechanic who has learned everything from Youtube. Super easy to do. Took me a bit when I first learned, now am able to bleed brakes for buddies and they're stoked on it too!

Let me know if you have any questions on bleeding your brakes or if you'd like to pick up a bleed kit yourself - my direct line is 801.204.4547 or you can email me at cojohnson@backcountry.com

(0)

 

0 Comments

Connor Johnson

Connor Johnsonwrote a review of on November 2, 2017

Great Gear Range on Gravel Bike
4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I was looking to drop the front derailleur on my beater CX/Gravel/Commuter Diamondback Haanjo trail and realized I could make my current Ultegra 11sp rear derailleur work with a Wolftooth Roadlink and this SLX 11-40 cassette. I went with the SLX to save a little dinero, even though its a bit added weight.

For the record, my drivetrain previously was a FSA 2x crankset, an Ultegra front and rear (medium cage I think) derailleur, and a 11-32 cassette. I went to the Rival 1 crankset, an SLX 11-40 cassette (Item #SHI00C1), and a Wolftooth Roadlink (Item #WFC0006). I'm running it with a Sram 11sp chain and it works flawlessly. I do wish the Ultegra derailleur had a clutch to keep chainslap down a bit on rougher CX terrain, but the shifting itself works flawlessly with the Wolftooth Roadlink.

If you have any questions on whether or not this is right for your derailleur or updating your drivetrain to a 1x, don't hesitate giving a shout and I'd be happy to help! My direct line is 801.204.4547 or you can reach me at cojohnson@backcountry.com

(0)

 

0 Comments

Connor Johnson

Connor Johnsonwrote a review of on November 2, 2017

Makes a 11-40 cassette work W/  1x Crank
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I was looking to drop the front derailleur on my beater CX/Gravel/Commuter Diamondback Haanjo trail and realized I could make my current Ultegra 11sp rear derailleur work with this Roadlink.

For the record, my drivetrain previously was a FSA 2x crankset, an Ultegra front and rear (medium cage I think) derailleur, and a 11-32 cassette. I went to the Rival 1 crankset, an SLX 11-40 cassette (Item #SHI00C1), and a Wolftooth Roadlink (Item #WFC0006). I'm running it with a Sram 11sp chain and it works flawlessly. I do wish the Ultegra derailleur had a clutch to keep chainslap down a bit on rougher CX terrain, but the shifting itself works flawlessly with the Wolftooth Roadlink.

If you have any questions on whether or not this is right for your derailleur or updating your drivetrain to a 1x, don't hesitate giving a shout and I'd be happy to help! My direct line is 801.204.4547 or you can reach me at cojohnson@backcountry.com

(0)

 

0 Comments

Connor Johnson

Connor Johnsonwrote a review of on November 2, 2017

Great Bang For Your Buck 1x Crankset
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Looking for a 1x crankset for a gravel or cyclocross bike that isn't going to break the bank? Look no further, the Rival 1 has it all and does a great job with it. I was looking to drop the front derailleur on my beater CX/Gravel/Commuter Diamondback Haanjo trail and the BCD & bolt pattern on the FSA 2x crankset was funky, meaning I decided a GXP threaded bottom bracket & the Rival 1 crank was my solution. It isn't a carbon crank, but I don't need one.

For the record, my drivetrain previously was a FSA 2x crankset, an ultegra front and rear (medium cage I think) derailleur, and a 11-32 cassette. I went to the Rival 1 crankset, an SLX 11-40 cassette (Item #SHI00C1), and a Wolftooth Roadlink (Item #WFC0006). I'm running it with a Sram 11sp chain and it works flawlessly. I do wish the Ultegra derailleur had a clutch to keep chainslap down a bit on rougher CX terrain, but the shifting itself works flawlessly.

If you have any questions on whether or not this is the right crankset for you, what bottom bracket you'll need with it, or updating your drivetrain to a 1x, don't hesitate giving a shout and I'd be happy to help! My direct line is 801.204.4547 or you can reach me at cojohnson@backcountry.com

(1)

 

0 Comments

Connor Johnson

Connor Johnsonwrote a review of on November 2, 2017

Aggressive 29" Shred Rig
4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

The Following is back! I'm 5'11" and have a 32" inseam - the demo I rode was a medium, but made me realize that even with the MB (more better)'s increased reach, I would absolutely go to the large. I'm currently riding a SB5.5 as my daily driver bike so much of this review is having it compared to that (I know its not a direct apples to apples comparison, but also a 29'er, just a bit more travel than the Evil Following). I rode this on a XC style ride putting some serious miles, in some full on shuttle DH laps, and a few rides of between the two.

What I liked About the Bike:
- I will say that Evil Bike's DELTA suspension takes a bit of getting used to. I'm coming off Yeti's Switch Infinity & DW Link bikes that are a touch more lively feeling. This is feels more like a DH bike and I'd imagine what a downhiller's trail bike would want to look like. It grows on you though, by the end I wanted more and more and was sad to return the demo back after the greater part of a week of riding.
- The climbing of the Following is decent. I wouldn't say its the most efficient bike out there, but I will say that the climbing is good enough for the downhill capability that this has.
- Going back into the DH capability - for 120mm of travel in the rear, this rig rides fantastic. While its definitely not going to ride as well as well as a full on downhill bike, it certainly can keep up as the runt of the litter. It'll eat up bumps and rock gardens (I was thankful for the 29" wheels on this) and rips on mid size jumps.
- I like the integrated chain guide, slick to have on the bike.
- (This is from my review of our own build of the Following MB item #EVB000B, but going to keep it if you're looking for an idea of what components to spec your bike with). The components were on point - this is how I'd like my own bike to be spec'd. GX Eagle really is one of the best bang for your buck drivetrains out there right now - just felt crisp and on point. The Reverb felt great, especially with the 1x lever on it. Sram Roam 50 Carbon wheels were solid - no flex as can happen with aluminum 29'er wheels and seemed burly enough for getting rowdy. I rode this with a 130mm fork and think that's what I'd do if I were to build up a Following MB from the frame up myself. I have never been a fan of Schwalbes due to slashing sidewalls & puncturing tires and lo and behold I managed to puncture both the front and tire - at least Schwalbe is consistent, right? I'd say throw on some Maxxis Minions and have no fears.

What I didn't like:
- It does take a bit of getting used to. I didn't hop on and immediately love it, which I feel like a lot of Evil Bike owners do.. I grew to love it for sure, but takes a bit of a learning curve I suppose.
- I don't think the suspension sag set tool works as well as it should. I had to fiddle with the air pressure a few times to get it actually dialed.
- Emphasizing my dislike for the the Schwalbe tires - the Nobby Nic is a trail tire (and I was excited to try out the new Addix tire compound) and it did not live up to my expectation. Luckily, I'd be happy to help out swap out the tires for you before we even ship the bike out to you!

If you are wondering if this is the bike for you or are looking to build up a custom build on the Following MB, don't hesitate giving a shout and I'd be stoked to get you on an Evil of your own! My direct line is 801.204.4547 or you can reach me at cojohnson@backcountry.com

(2)

 

Connor Johnson

Connor Johnsonwrote a review of on November 2, 2017

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

The Following is back! I'm 5'11" and have a 32" inseam - the demo I rode was a medium, but made me realize that even with the MB (more better)'s increased reach, I would absolutely go to the large. I'm currently riding a SB5.5 as my daily driver bike so much of this review is having it compared to that (I know its not a direct apples to apples comparison, but also a 29'er, just a bit more travel than the Evil Following). I rode this on a XC style ride putting some serious miles, in some full on shuttle DH laps, and a few rides of between the two.

What I liked About the Bike:
- I will say that Evil Bike's DELTA suspension takes a bit of getting used to. I'm coming off Yeti's Switch Infinity & DW Link bikes that are a touch more lively feeling. This is feels more like a DH bike and I'd imagine what a downhiller's trail bike would want to look like. It grows on you though, by the end I wanted more and more and was sad to return the demo back after the greater part of a week of riding.
- The climbing of the Following is decent. I wouldn't say its the most efficient bike out there, but I will say that the climbing is good enough for the downhill capability that this has.
- Going back into the DH capability - for 120mm of travel in the rear, this rig rides fantastic. While its definitely not going to ride as well as well as a full on downhill bike, it certainly can keep up as the runt of the litter. It'll eat up bumps and rock gardens (I was thankful for the 29" wheels on this) and rips on mid size jumps.
- I like the integrated chain guide, slick to have on the bike.
- The components were on point - this is how I'd like my own bike to be spec'd. GX Eagle really is one of the best bang for your buck drivetrains out there right now - just felt crisp and on point. The Reverb felt great, especially with the 1x lever on it. Sram Roam 50 Carbon wheels were solid - no flex as can happen with aluminum 29'er wheels and seemed burly enough for getting rowdy. I rode this with a 130mm fork and think that's what I'd do if I were to build up a Following MB from the frame up myself. I have never been a fan of Schwalbes due to slashing sidewalls & puncturing tires and lo and behold I managed to puncture both the front and tire - at least Schwalbe is consistent, right? I'd say throw on some Maxxis Minions and have no fears.

What I didn't like:
- It does take a bit of getting used to. I didn't hop on and immediately love it, which I feel like a lot of Evil Bike owners do.. I grew to love it for sure, but takes a bit of a learning curve I suppose.
- I don't think the suspension sag set tool works as well as it should. I had to fiddle with the air pressure a few times to get it actually dialed.
- Emphasizing my dislike for the the Schwalbe tires - the Nobby Nic is a trail tire (and I was excited to try out the new Addix tire compound) and it did not live up to my expectation. Luckily, I'd be happy to help out swap out the tires for you before we even ship the bike out to you!

If you are wondering if this is the bike for you, are looking to swap any components out, or interested in placing an order, don't hesitate giving a shout and I'd be stoked to get you on an Evil of your own! My direct line is 801.204.4547 or you can reach me at cojohnson@backcountry.com

(0)

 

Connor Johnson

Connor Johnsonwrote a review of on November 2, 2017

Compact Awesomeness
4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I'm 5'11" and and 175lbs. I ended up with the large - I likely could have gotten away with the medium also, but the fit of the large works well and isn't too tight fitting. I use this for trail running, mountain biking, hiking, and its great for travel as it packs up tight.

Pros:
- Its seriously small when its packed up - it packs into its own pocket. Its barely bigger than the size of an avocado. Its easy to pack into itself, but has room that makes me think it could be even smaller if need be.
- The hood is great and can fit up and over a beanie no problem.
- Like Kyle mentions below, it does fit in a fanny pack for mountain biking just fine. I'll one up him as I use the smaller Dakine Hot Laps pack and still have room for a tube, tools, and snacks in addition to the jacket. This is a cold wind / sporadic weather jacket that you can pull out of a nook of a backpack.

Cons:
- No other pockets than the small chest one, which I suppose is why its such a small jacket.
- Its got a DWR coating, but isn't a technical jacket.

Let me know if you have any other questions with it on intended use or sizing and I'd be happy to help! My direct line is 801.204.4547 or my email cojohnson@backcountry.com and I'd be happy to help!

(1)

 

0 Comments

Connor Johnson

Connor Johnsonwrote a review of on September 25, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I'm 5'11" and 175lbs. I rode a large and it was spot on for sizing. I rode on mostly flow trails with some chunky bits and jumps.

What I liked about the bike:
- I had a Santa Cruz Blur LT (v2) back in the day that I absolutely loved and the 5010 2.0 reminds me of an upgraded & new version of it. This brings back nostalgic, awesome memories on a similar handling bike.
- I'm a fan of the geometry of this bike; its fast and snappy, but I wouldn't be nervous taking it on more technical descents either. Its slack enough with the 67 degree headtube angle and its 5" of travel can get you through most rowdy stuff. I'd also be pretty happy pulling a full day ride in - this is like the Bronson's little brother that can also pack a punch.
- Pedal all day on this bad boy. Its pretty much the only thing it won't be able to do for you! The VPP3 suspension is efficient and I left the rear shock open when pedaling.
-Components are a great bang for your buck. Raceface Aeffect R with Novatec hubs with Maxxis rubber, GX Eagle drivetrain, solid Fox suspension, and Guide R brakes. Can't ask for anything that performs better than that.

What I didn't like about this bike:
- Not much that I didn't like. My riding style might get myself into some more technical terrain regularly, so might throw on a 140mm fork, but other than that there isn't much to change.

If you spend most days rippin' singletrack and are about pedaling (as opposed to shuttle days, etc) and like an aggressive, nimble bike, look no further. Overall just a fun trail bike! Let me know if you have any questions or would like help doing a custom build, reach me at 801.204.4547 or cojohnson@backcountry.com and I'll get you dialed!

(1)

 

0 Comments

Connor Johnson

Connor Johnsonwrote a review of on September 25, 2017

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I'm 5'11" and 175lbs. I rode a large and it was spot on for sizing. I rode on mostly flow trails with some chunky bits and jumps.

What I liked about the bike:
- I had a Santa Cruz Blur LT (v2) back in the day that I absolutely loved and the 5010 2.0 reminds me of an upgraded & new version of it. This brings back nostalgic, awesome memories on a similar handling bike.
- I'm a fan of the geometry of this bike; its fast and snappy, but I wouldn't be nervous taking it on more technical descents either. Its slack enough with the 67 degree headtube angle and its 5" of travel can get you through most rowdy stuff. I'd also be pretty happy pulling a full day ride in - this is like the Bronson's little brother that can also pack a punch.
- Pedal all day on this bad boy. Its pretty much the only thing it won't be able to do for you! The VPP3 suspension is efficient and I left the rear shock open when pedaling.
-Components are a great bang for your buck. Raceface Aeffect R with Novatec hubs with Maxxis rubber, GX Eagle drivetrain, solid Fox suspension, and Guide R brakes. Can't ask for anything that performs better than that.

What I didn't like about this bike:
- Not much that I didn't like. My riding style might get myself into some more technical terrain regularly, so might throw on a 140mm fork, but other than that there isn't much to change.

If you spend most days rippin' singletrack and are about pedaling (as opposed to shuttle days, etc) and like an aggressive, nimble bike, look no further. Overall just a fun trail bike! Let me know if you have any questions or would like help doing a custom build, reach me at 801.204.4547 or cojohnson@backcountry.com and I'll get you dialed!

(0)

 

0 Comments

Connor Johnson

Connor Johnsonwrote a review of on September 25, 2017

5010 Be Nimble, 5010 Be Quick!
5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I'm 5'11" and 175lbs. I rode a large and it was spot on for sizing. I rode on mostly flow trails with some chunky bits and jumps.

What I liked about the bike:
- I had a Santa Cruz Blur LT (v2) back in the day that I absolutely loved and the 5010 2.0 reminds me of an upgraded & new version of it. This brings back nostalgic, awesome memories on a similar handling bike.
- I'm a fan of the geometry of this bike; its fast and snappy, but I wouldn't be nervous taking it on more technical descents either. Its slack enough with the 67 degree headtube angle and its 5" of travel can get you through most rowdy stuff. I'd also be pretty happy pulling a full day ride in - this is like the Bronson's little brother that can also pack a punch.
- Pedal all day on this bad boy. Its pretty much the only thing it won't be able to do for you! The VPP3 suspension is efficient and I left the rear shock open when pedaling.
-Components are top notch. Raceface Arc 27 wheels (granted I rode it with the Enve m60's) with Maxxis rubber, X01 Eagle drivetrain, solid Fox Elite suspension, and Guide RSC brakes. Can't ask for anything that performs better than that.

What I didn't like about this bike:
- Not much that I didn't like. My riding style might get myself into some more technical terrain regularly, so might throw on a 140mm fork, but other than that there isn't much to change.

If you spend most days rippin' singletrack and are about pedaling (as opposed to shuttle days, etc) and like an aggressive, nimble bike, look no further. Overall just a fun trail bike! Let me know if you have any questions or would like help doing a custom build, reach me at 801.204.4547 or cojohnson@backcountry.com and I'll get you dialed!

(1)

 

0 Comments