Free 2-Day Shipping on Orders Over $50
1-888-276-7130
Summer Kit Special * Save 20% When You Buy A Top and Bottom
Andrew O.

Andrew O.

Andrew O.

Andrew O.wrote a review of on October 10, 2018

3 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

These are very well crafted shoes that fit great and are very comfortable.

Unfortunately, they have a fatal flaw (for my foot): The way the upper BOA wraps around the instep and ankle leads it to dig into the front of my ankle. Unlike many shoes with a traditional tongue, these have the upper actually wrap around the inner ankle. The "pulley" that receives the upper BOA lace makes contact with the tendon on the front of my ankle, causing painful chafing.

This is a real bummer, as otherwise the fit is fantastic. Try these on if you can; but for this issue they'd be a winner!

A note on fit: these are a good deal wider than Sidi/Fizik/Giro. I'd put them between standard and "mega" Sidis. Not a bad thing, but if you're used to narrow race-fit they might feel wide.

(0)

 

Andrew O.

Andrew O.wrote a review of on October 5, 2018

3 5

Familiarity: I returned this product before using it

This is a beautiful and well-made shoe. There were two aspects of the fit that soured it for me:
1) They're narrow. Very narrow! Like, even more narrow than Sidi. The toe of the shoe doesn't taper down as much as either the Sidi or Giro fit, but the overall width of the forefoot is awfully tight. Of course this may be great if your foot is likewise narrow, but I couldn't love 'em.
2) The top of the shoe wraps the foot in a well-considered way, but there is NO padding up there. For me, snugging down the BOA dials led to some uncomfortable hot spots on the top of my foot. Again, for some the shape may be great, and if so the lack of padding will probably yield great power transfer and a feeling of connection to the bike. But I couldn't get along with this aspect of the fit.

(0)

 

Andrew O.

Andrew O.wrote a review of on September 22, 2018

3 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've been thrashing a pair of Drakos for the last 2 seasons. A size 47 fit me well (12.5 street shoes). I've been riding in Sidis almost exclusively for the last 10 years on road and XC MTB, so I like the fit of the Sidi last. However, these are different to other Sidis I've tried.

The Drakos are all microtex pleather with holes in the leather for ventilation. This is in contrast to other Sidis, which have mesh windows built in to the toes. This has an important effect on the fit, as other shoes (Dragons and Tigers for example) are basically constructed as mesh booties with leather sewn on top; the Drakos are much stiffer in the toe box, and I was never able to get that "slipper-like" fit from them that I love in other Sidis. They feel very stiff, and are noticeably narrower and less supple than Tigers. The feel is like wearing a tight cast on your feet: It fits well, but is unyielding and some hot spots do arise.

Beyond that, there are a few points where I think Sidi lags behind other companies:
1) The Sidi "tecno 3" boa-type buckles are fiddly as you have to pop out the "handle" before you can use it, and the mechanism tends to get fouled with mud. And, you can't loosen them one click at a time, you can only fully release them. Both in contrast to the Boa system where you just reach down and tighten/loosen by turning a nice rubber dial one click at a time.

2) I find Sidi's carbon sole solution to be obsolete. The exposed carbon with bolt-on treads just doesn't work well, and adds user hassles. Specifically:
-Higher stack-height than other top end shoes
-No rubber under the arch, which makes both walking on rough terrain and pedaling without being clipped in (e.g. getting started on a very steep hill) super tough. The exposed carbon sole tends to get shredded too.
-Increased weight due to all that hardware
-Propensity for the screws holding on treads to loosen over time. I lost a bolt mid-way through a long race which led to one of the cleat-adjacent treads partly coming off.
-Most damningly, the threaded T-nuts that are permanently installed in the carbon sole to catch the tread bolts tend to come unbonded and spin when you try to loosen/tighten the bolts. Once this happens you can't easily change the treads any more, negating the "benefit" of the whole overcomplicated system. All in all this carbon sole has the feel of a first attempt from the mid-90s that should've been upgraded years ago.

WITH THAT SAID, I have not found another shoe that fits my foot or lasts as long (sole issues excluded) as a Sidi. Maybe I'm a victim of self-inflicted foot binding after my years wearing Sidis, but I just can't help but come back to Sidi despite trying many other options. However, I find the Tiger and Dragon models are much more comfy than these Drakos.

(1)

 

Andrew O.

Andrew O.wrote a review of on August 27, 2017

1 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

OK, I love these pedals for their shape, thinness, grip etc. The problem, and it's not a small one, is with reliability. Unfortunately, this is a design flaw.

Here's the flaw: These pedals have one large inboard bearing and 3 very small outboard ones. The problem is that the pedal body is attached to the spindle by a bolt that traps the inner race of the 3 small outer bearings. WHAT THIS MEANS is that when those small bearings fail, the pedal actually FALLS OFF THE BIKE.

I don't mind needing to replace bearings from time to time when they get gritty, but this failure mode is unacceptable. I've had 2 rides cut short by this issue; I feel fortunate that I've never lost a pedal mid-jump or during a race, when it could cause a bad crash. Terrible engineering ruins what's otherwise a good pedal.

(1)

 

0 Comments

Andrew O.

Andrew O.wrote a review of on January 6, 2014

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

While I haven't had this long enough to make a call on long-term reliability, I can say that it worked great out of the box, was easy to install, and has been flawless over the first month and ~200 trail miles in the PNW mud. Having used (and returned due to blown seals) a Reverb and KS Lev, this one has been the most pleasant user experience of the lot so far. The trigger feels great on the bar and fits well with shifter/brakes. Fingers crossed on reliability!

(3)

 

0 Comments

Andrew O.

Andrew O.wrote a review of on December 11, 2013

They messed this one up
1 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

Alas, KS screwed up what would have been a great post with an awful actuator design. By actuator, I refer to the gizmo on the bottom of the post (so inside the frame) that releases the post to let it move up or down. The design KS chose was to affix the cable head to the bottom of the post, such that the cable doesn't move. When you hit the handlebar trigger, it's actually the housing that moves along the (fixed) cable.

The problem is obvious: the housing goes through all sorts of zip ties and grommets on its way into the post, so it doesn't move freely. Also, because the housing is not affixed to the bottom of the post, any raising or lowering of the post in the frame makes it quit working.

This is an awful design, and I assume KS will fix it soon as it's basically non-functional. Let's hope so, as this minor screwup ruins what could have been a great post.

UPDATE:
I stand by my initial negative review, but as pointed out below KS has since addressed this issue with a revised actuator. You can see a photo of the new one at the link below; basically if you have a rigid piece that protruded down from the bottom of your post it's the new one.
http://ep1.pinkbike.org/p4pb10680054/p4pb10680054.jpg

I have no experience with the revised post, so can't comment on the new design. I believe KS will retrofit existing posts if you send them in, though it's not a fast process.

(0)