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Ibis Mojo HD3 Carbon Mountain Bike Frame - 2017

Ibis Mojo HD3 Carbon Mountain Bike Frame - 2017
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Sale $1,699.00 - $1,950.00 $3,269.00 40% Off

Item # IBS003I

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  • Matte, Fox Performance, XL ($1,699.00)
  • Green, Fox Performance, S ($1,699.00)
  • Green, Fox Performance, XL ($1,699.00)
  • Green, Fox Float X2, XL ($1,950.00)
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Item # IBS003I

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Description

Customized enduro.

Dropping in with accolades of HD heritage and rolling with modern touches designed for today's riding styles, the 2017 Ibis Mojo HD3 Carbon Mountain Bike Frame carries over last year's well-received updates into a new year. As with its predecessor, this HD3's long, low geometry wrangles steep lines with glee, and its stiff boost axles bump up the volume to accommodate tires ranging from 2.3in speed demons to a plus-sized 2.8-inchers.

The Mojo HD3's DW-Link suspension platform isolates rear wheel movement from pedaling and braking forces so you can expect a plush and linear suspension motion that feels like an even bigger bike, yet pedals on flats and climbs with the attitude of an XC machine. The 66.6-degree angle of the tapered head tube takes advantage of DW-Link's solidity and the chassis' stability to hit a steeper angle than most six-inch bikes. That means the Mojo HD3 digs into climbs with an aggressive front end that doesn't leave you hanging when you're dropping in for the descent.

The bike's spine is built on stout, 16.9in chainstays and a low, 13.5in-high bottom bracket, which team with the aforementioned geometry for an uncommonly agile enduro sled that gets up and goes when the trail turns skyward or drops in fast when things point down, defying the categorizations that limit so many other bikes. As an added bonus, the shock tune and suspension keep the bottom bracket height at the sag point the same, no matter what size tire you choose to run.

The frame boasts clean internal cable routing and stealth routing for a dropper post of your choice. Ibis stands by threaded bottom brackets with the Mojo, a move that mercifully dismisses any proprietary press-fit systems in favor of a rock-solid standard that will last for ages. Dual-row angular contact bearings on the drive-side of the linkage require zero preload adjustment and dramatically reduce play compared to standard, sealed bearings, further bolstering the bike's lateral solidity and your own sense of control.

  • Ibis' ultimate enduro machine boasts 27.5+ versatility
  • 6-inches of responsive DW-Link suspension
  • Long, slack geometry tackles bigger lines
  • Carbon construction reduces weight and increases stiffness
  • Removable derailleur mouint lets you choose gearing
  • Boost rear hub stiffens wheelsets
  • Compatible with tires ranging from 2.3 to 2.8in

Tech Specs

Frame Material:
carbon fiber
Suspension:
DW-Link
Wheel Size:
27.5 in, 27.5+
Rear Shock:
Fox Factory FLOAT DPS 3pos w/ Adj and EVOL Sleeve with Kashima Coat
Rear Travel:
150mm
Head Tube Diameter:
ZS44/ZS56 mixed tapered
Headset Included:
no
Bottom Bracket Type:
68mm BSA threaded
ISCG Tabs:
yes, ISCG 05
Cable Routing:
internal
Front Derailleur Mount:
direct-mount removable
Brake Type:
post-mount disc
Seatpost Diameter:
31.6mm
Rear Axle:
12 x 148mm Boost thru-axle
Recommended Use:
all-mountain, enduro
Manufacturer Warranty:
7 years

Geometry Chart

Ibis

Geometry Chart

 

Mojo HD3
150mm Travel Fork
 

Seat Tube

(c-t)

Effective Top Tube

(eTT)

Stand Over

Head Tube

(HT)

Head Tube Angle

(HTo)

Seat Tube Angle

(STo)

Bottom Bracket Height

(BBH)

Chainstay

(CS)

Wheelbase
S 14.5in 22.8in 27.7in 3.3in 67o 74.1o 13.4in 16.9in 44.5in
M 16.5in 23.6in 28.7in 4.1in 67o 73.1o 13.4in 16.9in 45in
L 18.5in 24.4in 28.8in 4.6in 67o 73.1o 13.4in 16.9in 45.8in
XL 20.5in 25.2in 29.8in 5.2in 67o 73.1o 13.4in 16.9in 46.7in
160mm Travel Fork
 

Seat Tube

(c-t)

Effective Top Tube

(eTT)

Stand Over

Head Tube

(HT)

Head Tube Angle

(HTo)

Seat Tube Angle

(STo)

Bottom Bracket Height

(BBH)

Chainstay

(CS)

Wheelbase
S 14.5in 22.8in 27.8in 3.3in 66.6o 73.6o 13.5in 16.9in 44.7in
M 16.5in 23.6in 28.8in 4.1in 66.6o 72.6o 13.5in 16.9in 45.1in
L 18.5in 24.4in 28.9in 4.6in 66.6o 72.6o 13.5in 16.9in 46in
XL 20.5in 25.2in 30in 5.2in 66.6o 72.6o 13.5in 16.9in 46.8in

Reviews & Community

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Unanswered Question

Trying to figure out what size frame would be best for me, I am 6'2". But most of that is torso. I used your bike fit guide but that really isn't helping me much with the frame size.

Will a 2.8" x 27.5" tire fit?

Yes that bike will fit up to a 27.5x2.8in tire.



feel free to reach out to me directly if you have any more questions about that bike.

Traded in my Carbon Tracer

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

After owning every generation of Intense bikes since 2000 I purchased a new Tracer carbon 275. After working on it for 3 months, and spending hundreds of dollars, I could not eliminate the bottom bracket noise, which was caused by the press-fit bottom bracket. The only thing I didn't try on the bottom bracket was Loctite, and I wasn't willing to. Even if I fixed the bottom bracket noise I would still have rattling cables and hoses, and I couldn't find a good solution.

So, I did a lot of research and selected the Mojo HD3. It has the threaded bottom bracket and even has a front Derailleur Mount, so I can keep my XTR M9020 2x11 drivetrain. This frame was full of surprises, and all of them were good. The cable and hose routing is the best I've seen on any bike. There are different options for the shifter cables, so you can decide between running full cable housings or you can run cable stops, so inside the frame it's just cable - no cable housing. There are trade-offs with each method, but it's great to have the choice. You will never have to use a bearing press to change the suspension bearings, because Ibis sells the suspension links for a very reasonable price, and the bearings are pre-installed. Every time I need to replace a suspension bearing I have to buy or make another tool, even though I have several presses and lots of drifts, so I am looking forward to the next time I need bearings. The seatpost clamp is proprietary, so I couldn't install my Thomson clamp, but I didn't care because the Ibis clamp is a work of art. The frame has a post mount rear brake mount, so no adapters are needed (for 160mm rotors). I can really tell the bike has been refined by mountain bike riders. I also purchased a set of Ibis 738 Alloy wheels so that I could try Plus tires. The wheels are very reasonably priced. I may purchase a set of Ibis carbon wheels, but I liked the idea if spending less just to try out the Plus tires. I purchased Maxxis Highroller II 2.8 tires. I had the same tire in the 2.4 size, and I liked them a lot, so I ordered that model in 2.8. The Plus tires/wheels are amazing. I am still trying to find a negative trade-off. I like everything about them. I run the front at 10 PSI and the rear at 13 PSI. I didn't purchase the frame for the plus size tires, but I am very glad I did. I always liked running low air pressure on my 2.4 tires, but they would feel squirmy at speed. The 2.8 tires have a better ride, much better stability at low pressures, and better traction. It's a huge difference. For me, it wasn't like the change from 26 to 27.5. That was a minor change compared to the plus size tires. 2.8 is the new normal for me. I could never go back to 2.4. I love the suspension. I really liked the suspension on the Tracer 275, so I was a little worried about the DW suspension on the Ibis. The Ibis DW suspension is much better for climbing, especially up rocks and roots. It just sucks 'em up. And I don't feel any feedback from the suspension. i liked the VP suspension on my other bikes, so I was surprised that I liked the DW design even more.

I am really sorry to see the prevalence of press-fit bottom brackets, so it's nice to find a company that spends a few extra dollars to do it right. Santa Cruz is another brand that has the threaded bottom bracket, so it was difficult to decide whether to purchase the Ibis or a Santa Cruz. I think I would have been happy with a Santa Cruz too, but I could not be happier with my new Mojo HD3. Working with the Backcountry staff was also a pleasant experience. This was my best bike purchase ever.

Traded in my Carbon Tracer

I found a playful enduro bike!

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

Like the title says, this bike is amazingly playful and fun for how much travel it has and how capable it is on the downhills. I had a chance to demo this bike a couple times and while I didn't end up owning it, I came away with several impressions I wanted to leave here.

Back to what I was saying about the playfulness. Enduro bikes are getting longer, slacker, raked out, lower bottom brackets, etc. This bike is still slack (66.6 degree head angle) but the short 16.9 inch chainstay combined with the shorter wheelbase (46 inches in a large) gives the bike a surprisingly playful character that makes it feel like a shorter travel, more nimble bike. Steer it into a rock garden, and you need to be a bit more choosy about the line you pick, but if you do, it rewards you with knife edge precision and maneuverability.

It also climbs surprisingly well for how capable it is downhill. The DW link suspension uses chain tension to hold the suspension in place and keep it from moving while climbing, and I can say I never felt like I needed to switch the rear shock over into climb mode, it just works great in the middle trail mode.

Overall, this is a fantastic bike that I would highly recommend to anyone looking for a super versatile bike that descends incredibly well. Plus, we have a fantastic deal on this frame right now, and we can build it up using a variety of different parts. I would be happy to help build up a bike, you can reach me directly at ldordai@backcountry.com or 801.736.6396 x2344.

all good

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

I am not usually a long travel rider, I run more trail and XC routes. I got a chance to ride the HD3 on some proper terrain and it made me consider changing my riding. going uphill on a bike with this much plush can disappoint but not the case on the HD3. I am not fast going downhill but I picked up a whole new skill set just riding the Ibis. I rode the ibis 738's which are a pretty inexpensive wheel but not to bad. I had XT 1X which was great, but I think eagle X01 my be my preference. I am 5'7" and rode a S with a 50 stem.

I know what the specs say.... but, will my nox carbon farlows with maxxis 29x2.3 minions fit up in the chainstays on this frame????? Any user feedback?

Andrew,



This bike will not fit 29" wheels and tires, the diameter is just too great. Plus the taller bottom bracket height would throw off the handling of the bike.

The funnest bike I have ever owned

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

What makes this bike unique is it's ability to smash through rough terrain with ease, just to turn around and fly up the ascents. The DW link provides a bottomless feel when pushing through the whole suspension travel, but maintains a sturdy pedaling platform that flat out hauls up the mountain for a 6 inch travel bike.

Ibis emphasizes on creating efficient, playful bikes and have really achieved that goal on the HD3. Longer and slacker than its predecessors, with pedaling performance on the same level as the Ibis Ripley.

If you have questions regarding this bike, or if you would like to place and order, you can call or email me any time.

Trevor Linthorst
Expert Gearhead - Bike
P: 801.204.4563
E: tlinthorst@backcountry.com