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Thule Round Trip Sport Bike Travel Case


Item # THU000X

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  • Black, One Size ($379.95)

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Item # THU000X


Store and protect your bike from the toughest baggage handlers with Thule's Round Trip Sport Bike Travel Case, whose hard-sided, durable polyethylene construction will prevent damage to your road or 'cross machine. Despite Thule's blanket assertion that it also fits mountain bikes, we find it unable to accommodate most contemporary models, especially in the presence of a stealth dropper seatpost, and we'd also caution against trying to cram a large road frame with a standard geometry into it. Given the Round Trip's size, we'd stick to using it for compact road or 'cross bikes only.

To ease transport, Thule equipped the case with integrated wheels. Internal dividers keep the bike's wheels separate from the frame to protect its finish. The case splits into two for easy loading, and four heavy-duty straps wrap around it to securely hold it all together. The internal dimensions are 45 x 28.5 x 10in and the external are 47 x 30.5 x 10.5in. Its compact size is ideal for flight and shipping, but again: it makes it prohibitive for mountain bikes or larger, traditional geometry road frames.

  • Polyethylene construction
  • Four heavy-duty external straps
  • Splits in half, with internal partition
  • Foam padding inside

Tech Specs

[internal] 45 x 28.5 x 10 in, [external] 47 x 30.5 x 10 in
Recommended Use:
Manufacturer Warranty:

Reviews & Community


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    I just came from riding GFNY Mexico, case worked just fine, the bike was protected 100%. Room enaugh for the bike ( 56 cm), foot pump, uniforms, helmet and in my way back home, some dirty clothing. A 29" will fit perfectly inside.

    Avg. ride time: 2h 42m per week
    • Average ride time is based on Strava activity over the last 3 months. Give your reviews credibility by connecting your account.

    Adequate but heavy

      This case is bomb-proof, no doubt about it, but it is 30 lbs. empty, meaning that most airlines will charge an overage fee if anything (bike, tools, kit) exceeds 20 lbs. The other improvements would be to make the shells nest together for storage in a car trunk, and better latches. The quality of these items is much lower than on my other Thule products.

      The dimensions exceed the checked baggage fee limits (l+w+h of 65in.), so regardless of the 50 lb weight limit, expect to pay the overage fee for dimensions alone.

      What are the main differences between this case and the Thule Round Trip Transition Bike Case (retails for $600). I have an R3 cervelo (50cm) and I would like to buy the best case (quality, safety and price). Any suggestions or feedback is welcome, please email at Thank you!

      The Round Trip Transition Bike Case is larger with interior dimensions of

      Internal height 37 in

      Internal length 54 in

      Internal depth 15.5 in

      and is also a little heavier. With a 50cm bike you won't have issues with space on some shipping cases as someone with a large frame size would.

      Does it fit tri bikes? Hows the padding...

      Does it fit tri bikes? Hows the padding on the inside?


      This is also a similar situation as the EEP bag that we have. It will fit a medium size tri bike, but you may have to take the bars off. The wheels travel great in these and there are large pads inside to protect. These tend to be a tight squeeze, and I may have had to sit on my box a time or two when stuffing it full. I have never had any issues when traveling with my mountain bikes or road bikes in this box.

      Email me at if you need further insight!


      do the handlebar and or rear derrailler...

      do the handlebar and or rear derrailler have to be removed


      It all depends on the size of the frame. It is almost certain you will need to remove the handlebar. However, having to remove the rear derailleur would definitely be dependent on frame size. I would say if you had a small frame you should be alright, whereas a larger frame may require some attached parts to be removed.