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Item # SRM0468

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  • One Color, Rear XX1 135/142 ($924.99)
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Item # SRM0468

Big wheels, little weight.

Of all the wheel sizes out there, the one that probably benefits the most from carbon fiber construction are 29ers. Lowering rotational weight as much as possible on larger wheels can be a game changer on the trail. When SRAM purchased Zipp Speed Weaponry a few years back, it acquired the the carbon rim technology needed to develop the high-tech Rise 60 29in Wheels.

It should be noted that Zipp, a longtime (20 plus years) composite component and wheel specialty manufacturing company, has been building carbon rims for road applications for some time now. This know-how is evident in the asymmetric shape and impact-protecting HS resin coating. The asymmetric shape allows SRAM to use near equal length spokes, creating a stronger complete structure. The rim's layers and 3K weave are enhanced to provide strength where the nipples place the most stress to ensure reliability.

The Rise 60 uses stainless steel and bladed Sapim CX-Ray spokes. These spokes are incredibly strong, aerodynamic, and only weigh a touch more than titanium ones. SRAM uses two-cross lacing with 24 spokes per wheel. This reduces weight and ensures optimal stiffness to resist wheel deflection. The straight pull design eliminates stress-prone bends to which traditional spokes are subject.

The hub shell and freehub body are made of lightweight, 6000 series aluminum. They house sealed cartridge bearings for maximum performance and minimum maintenance. The rear hub uses four bearings and it has an aluminum freehub body to keep weight low. A 54-tooth drive ring gives just under seven degrees of engagement, while three pawls with a saw-tooth profile offer nine points of purchase to give the Rise 60s instant and positive engagement when you stomp on the pedals.

SRAM Rise 60 29-Inch Wheels are intended for cross-country race and marathon use. While they're not tubeless ready, they are compatible with tubeless conversion kits such as Stan's No Tubes. They're available with standard quick releases or with 15QR front and 12x142mm rear. They are compatible with six-bolt rotors and Shimano or SRAM cassettes.

  • Asymmetrical rim shape with HS resin coating
  • Improved impact-resistance for XC racing
  • Stainless steel and bladed Sapim CX-Ray spokes
  • Two-cross lacing with 24 spokes per wheel
  • Hub shell and freehub body made from a lightweight 6000-series aluminum
  • Cartridge bearings are sealed in-house

Tech Specs

Rim Material:
carbon fiber
Wheel Size:
26 in
Spoke Count:
24
Claimed Weight:
1420 g
Recommended Use:
all-mountain/enduro

Reviews & Community

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SRAM Rise 60 29in Wheels

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Here's what others have to say...

Avg. ride time: 4h 53m per week
  • Average ride time is based on Strava activity over the last 3 months. Give your reviews credibility by connecting your account.
4 5

Sram Rise 60

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I like these wheels a lot! i ride a fully ridge 29er and have no issues with them other then they are slightly heavy. my free hub body doesn't fall off and never has but i was aware of the issue when i purchased them(maybe luck). These are my first set of carbon wheels and they have preformed very in every area from climbing to descending and just eat really rough single track. to be honest i forget their there. they just feel like a extension of the bike if you know what mean.

Not for everyone. internal rim width is narrow at best and is not suitable for enduro or DH. but if you read the product description you would understand this.

1 5

Terrible design and worse support

  • Gender: Male
  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

The wheels are relatively light and stiff, but as the other reviewer stated, the freehub and cassette literally fall off EVERY TIME you take the wheel off the bike. The first time I rode the bike, as luck would have it, I blew a sidewall on the Racing Ralphs it came with (so much for light weight XC tires for a daily rig in rocky New England). As I was putting the tube in, the freehub falls off into the leaves and dirt face down, ruining the grease. I cleaned it up, bewildered, put it back on and it happened again. This time, a pawl fell out too! They were disintegrating on the trail just from changing a damn flat! Luckily I found it, but every time I got the damn cassette back on and tried to mount the tire in the bike, the freehub would slide off again. It took me 30mins to change a flat. So incredibly lame. My riding buddies were sitting there annoyed and I had a poor impression of my new bike, all because they cant figure out how to secure the caps correctly.

My local bike ship is awesome and they offered to call SRAM for me to see how to fix it. The fix? "Put super heavy duty boat grease in there to make it sticky. That should do it."

You know what else super thick boat grease is good for? Slowing down your $2000+ carbon wheel freehub. Ridiculous.

They have even redesigned the wheel, but instead of taking care of their customers they pretend this was "by design". No matter what they do, they have made it clear where they stand on customer service. Does not sit well at all with me. STEAR CLEAR.

1 5

These are the worst wheels ever!

Stay away from these at all costs. The machining on the real axle is off which causes the free hub body to simply slide off with no effort. Putting the free hub body back on with the cassette still mounted is nearly impossible. Now imagine you're on the trail and you get a flat. Once you remove the tire, you risk the free hub body sliding out and all of the little parts that go along with it. I've never experienced this issue with any other wheelset I own. The only way to keep the free hub body on is to leave the wheels on the bike! This is completely unacceptable!