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Ridley Helium RS/SRAM Force Complete Road Bike - 2014

$2,517.00 $4,195.00

Item # RID000X 40% Off

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  • Black/Red, X-SMALL ($2,517.00)
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Item # RID000X

Description

Lightweight is an understatement.

After successfully increasing the Damocles' stiffness and stability, while dramatically reducing its overall weight, Ridley's engineers emerged with what would become known as the Helium. At nearly 300 grams lighter than the Damocles, it's a frame that was bred for the mountains. Not surprisingly, this was Ridley's objective all along. Essentially, this frame was designed to be built to the UCI's 6.8kg limit, giving you the lightest platform possible to hammer up the climbs. The Helium's proven design continues in 2014, with several enhanced features. These include dual purpose cable routing, which cleanly route both mechanical and electronic drivetrains internally, as well as the versatile, non-integrated 27.2mm seatpost design. Combine these updates with a full SRAM Force 22 drivetrain, and the Helium is ready to propel you up the steepest switchbacks with ease.

The new Helium frame tips the scales at roughly 850 grams in the Medium size. This was accomplished through its use of superior grades of carbon fiber. In fact, the Helium predominantly uses both 30- and 24-ton carbon fiber, with areas of 40-ton and 50-ton reinforcements. But, if you're wondering what the "ton" designation is, it essentially reflects how many tons of pressure per square millimeter that the carbon is able to withstand before failure. Thus, 30-ton carbon will withstand 30 tons of pressure per square millimeter. By using high-grade carbon, Ridley's able to use less carbon in the production process. After all, common logic tells us that the stronger a material that's used, the less of it that's need. As a result, the Helium is able to achieve a lower frame weight. And to further reduce weight, the Helium also utilizes full-carbon dropouts with stainless steel inserts. Additionally, it doesn't use any aluminum in the head tube bearing races.

And while materials are a key foundation for a sound strength-to-weight ratio, the construction process and tube shapes are of equal measure. Along these lines, we find it comforting that Ridley draws its tube shape inspiration from the most tested designs on earth — nature itself. You'll find that Ridley's strongest frames, like the Fenix, feature tube shapes inspired by the diamond. Meanwhile, frames like the Helium are based on the circle. Yes, the circle. As Ridley asserts, the circle reflects the best stiffness-to-weight ratio in nature, as it requires the least amount of materials in order to achieve the highest amount of strength. Accordingly, you'll find that Ridley designed the tube shapes of the seat, top, and down tubes with rounded, circular shaping. However, for sake of even higher rigidity, and weight savings, the top tube has been slightly tapered. Adding to this theme of lightweight rigidity, the Helium features a hollow-molded bottom bracket. This design allowed Ridley to remove excess materials, and the ability to reshape the conjoining tubes. As a result, needless weight has been eliminated, while lateral rigidity has been increased.

Going a step even further, Ridley also built the front triangle of the Helium with a monocoque construction. Surprisingly, the definition of the monocoque process is hidden within the name — "mono" being Latin for "one," and "coque" being French for "shell." So, as logic would have it, monocoque carbon fiber is formed as one piece in a single mold. This system allowed Ridley complete creative control in developing the Helium. From the geometry to the tube shaping to the layup, every design parameter is attainable with monocoque, whereas the tube-to-tube construction method that you see on halo bikes is far more limiting for the engineer. As a result, the front triangle was met by flat-designed seatstays and oversized chainstays. Essentially, this design increases lateral stiffness, while also absorbing road vibration.

The Helium comes with a matching Ridley 4ZA monocoque full-carbon fiber fork and a proprietary FSA integrated headset. This system further increases rigidity under load, especially where the Helium excels, on the climbs. Additionally, this characteristic has been further increased through the incorporation of a 1-1/8 x 1-1/4-inch head tube. And with a 99.0cm wheelbase, a 73.5 degree head tube angle, and a 73 degree seat tube angle (size Medium), the Helium is guaranteed to descend confidently, and more importantly, quickly.

For the build, Ridley spec'd the Helium with SRAM's renowned Force 22 11-speed groupset. The crankset is a Rotor 3D 52/36t, paired with an 11-25t cassette out back. For the cockpit, the build features a 4ZA handlebar and stem. Topping the 4ZA post is a Special Kit saddle, and in terms of wheels, the bike rolls on a pair of Fulcrum Racing 7s that've been cased in Continental GP tires.

The Ridley Helium RS/SRAM Force Complete Road Bike - 2014 is available in five sizes from X-Small to X-Large and in the color Black/red.

Tech Specs

Frame Material:
high-modulus carbon fiber
Fork:
4ZA Helium
Fork Material:
carbon fiber
Headset:
1.125 x 1.25 in
Shifters:
SRAM Force 22 Double Tap
Front Derailleur:
SRAM Force 22
Rear Derailleur:
SRAM Force 22
Crankset:
52 / 36 t Rotor 3DF PF30
Bottom Bracket:
PF30
Cassette:
11 - 25 t Force 22
Brake Calipers:
SRAM Force 22
Handlebar:
4ZA
Stem:
4ZA
Saddle:
Special Kit (4ZA)
Seatpost:
4ZA
Wheelset:
Fulcrum Racing 7
Skewers:
included
Tires:
Continental Grand Prix
Recommended Use:
cycling, road racing
Manufacturer Warranty:
5 years on frame
Actual Weight:
Black/Red, SMALL: 7,590g

Geometry chart

Ridley

Geometry Chart

 

Helium
 

Seat Tube

(c-t)

Effective Top Tube

(eTT)

Stack

(S)

Reach

(R)

Stand Over

Head Tube

(HT)

Head Tube Angle

(HT°)

Seat Tube Angle

(ST°)

Bottom Bracket Drop

(BBD)

Chainstay

(CS)

Wheelbase
 XS  48.0cm  52.5cm  53.0cm  37.5cm  74.0cm  13.0cm  72°  74°  6.8cm  40.5cm  97.4cm
 S  51.0cm  54.5cm  54.5cm  38.5cm  75.0cm  14.5cm  73°  73.5°  6.6cm  40.5cm  97.7cm
 M  54.0cm  56.5cm  57.5cm  39.0cm  78.0cm  17.5cm  73.5°  73°  6.6cm  40.5cm  99.0cm
 L  57.0cm  58.5cm  60.2cm  40.0cm  81.0cm  20.5cm  73.5°  72.5°  6.3cm  40.8cm  100.3cm
XL  60.0cm  60.0cm  62.5cm  40.5cm  84.0cm  23.0cm  74°  72.5°  6.3cm  40.8cm  101.2cm

Geometry Chart

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Here's what others have to say...

Unanswered Question

Is this red frame with white lettering,...

Posted on

Is this red frame with white lettering, or black frame with red lettering like the frame only pics? Not digging the bright red frame, like the sleeker subtle look.

What does the RS stand for in the Ridley...

Posted on

What does the RS stand for in the Ridley Helium RS/SRAM Force Complete Road Bike - 2014? Is the frame different than the standard Helium frame? Thanks

Best Answer Responded on

Carbon lay up. The RS uses simple high modulus carbon while the Helium and Helium SL use higher "ton" rated carbon.

Responded on

RS = Regular Seatpost / IS = Integrated Seatpost

Responded on

in this case the first answer, "carbon lay up..." is correct. while manuel is right that IS is for integrated seat post, and the RS version does not have an integrated seat post, "regular seat post" is not what RS stands for here.

RS is as opposed to SL. SL is the superlight version with higher rated carbon. the RS version uses lower rated carbon (and thus weighs a touch more), to spare you some cost; which is also why the RS is cheaper than the SL.

So, RS = slightly heavier frame and moderately cheaper, while SL = slightly lighter frame that is more expensive. The question is, of course, do they ride differently (as far as rigidity and vertical compliance)? Hard to know, but one would think there has to be a slight difference in the ride feel, if you are someone who can feel such a tiny difference.