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#432 of 8 points

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3 5

Castelli really hit a home run with the Nanoflex fabric ? it's brushed for warmth, and repels wind and moderate moisture (rain, snow, etc.) with relative ease. No wonder why the Garmin guys insist on this stuff. Downside: zero articulation in the construction. No elbow bend or shaping makes the warmers bunch up where your arms bend. Not exactly uncomfortable, but not ideal either. Still a great product.

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5 5

"Asian Fit" tends to turn a lot of prospective wearers away, simply because it's a bit misleading. This delineation is simply reserved for certain Oakley frames with a slightly narrower and deeper nose bridge. They certainly fit a good many Asian facial profiles, but other facial types are not a complete exclusion. To really dial in the right fit, Oakley also includes a second pair of specially-sized nose pads with the AF Split Jackets which allow the frame to sit a little bit higher on your face. If you struggle with finding sunglasses that don't perch comfortably on your nose and bump the tops of your cheeks, the Asian Fit might be for you. Frame width is not part of the equation here; if you have a wider head, they'll still fit, but if you have a wider or 'taller' nose, you'll probably want the standard Split Jacket. Fit aside, the Split Jacket is an excellent medium-coverage sport frame that lacks some of the overt aggression of the Jawbone, while still delivering top-tier performance with an intuitive lens interchange system. Note that all Split Jacket lenses will fit any model of Split Jacket frame - Asian Fit, or otherwise.

* I have a medium-large sized head and prefer the coverage of the Jawbone, but this Split Jacket still fits fine - it's just a matter of getting the nose bomb fit just right
* changing out the nose bombs on the Split Jackets is easy, but there is a specific technique to doing it without damaging the mounts:
1) unlock the nose piece to open the frame's "jaw" and remove the lens
2) take notice of the tiny "claw" opening on the nose piece (the part that attaches to the alloy bar in the frame), grip the frame firmly (you might find it easier to close the jaw first), and pull the nose piece directly downward - opposite the attachment point and away from the frame

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5 5

Honestly not a big fan of any saddle bag, but this was a nice compromise. Went with the Small and was pleased at how neatly and securely it tucks directly beneath the saddle. While you should expect a pretty snug fit, the Small should fit a single tube, a C02 cartridge + inflator, and a pair of levers. There's also a clever external pouch on the underside of the straps for your multi-tool, which is especially handy as it grants quick access to this regularly-needed tool without forcing you to dig through the pouch. Bear in mind that if you plan on carrying your phone or any snacks in the pouch, I would recommend getting the Medium size.

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5 5

For several seasons, my Gore Power bibs have been the de facto standard for fit and comfort against which I measure everything else I wear for riding. The Xenon 2.0 surpasses that standard in every way. The straps are slightly wider and softer to eliminate chafing, while remaining exceptionally lightweight as they disappear against your shoulders. The leg ending features a thick band of tight lycra along with subtle silicone grippers on the inside - both of which combine for a perfectly secure leg fit. And the insert - again, better in every way. Multiple densities for perfect support, carbon fiber threading helps keep the insert dry and adds antimicrobial protection, and the insert's deep channel allows for even better ventilation. Truly a top-shelf short worthy of sitting on the top shelf.

* I fit a Gore Medium across the chart, and the Xenon doesn't surprise

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5 5

Most impressive and telling about the Xenon glove is how even with its superlight construction and subtle padding, it's still remarkably durable, supportive, and surprisingly easy to remove. Lesser gloves leave hands numb after long hours, don't ventilate well, or simply fall apart after the first few rides. And it strikes a fine balance between 'just enough' padding in the right places so as to not compromise your feel on the bars. Cycling gloves aren't for everyone, but that's simply because not all gloves are created equal.

* wear a Large size glove across the branding spectrum, and these are no different

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5 5

If you owned multiple pairs of Radar sunglasses because changing the lenses was more trouble than it's worth, listen up. There's a lot of praise that could be heaped upon the Radarlock, but at the end of the day, the most important fact is that it is a significant and wholly justified upgrade over the original Radar - and one that doesn't come at the expense of sacrificing what makes the Radar platform the ultimate sporting frame.

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5 5

I wasn't crazy about the original Pivlock, and Smith must have been listening, because the new version is leaps and bounds better. Much more aggressive styling and a subtly updated lens geometry with nicely improved nose piece adjustment. Fit is still super lightweight, but it now slides around helmet retention systems more comfortably. There's an awful lot to like here, and in case you were wondering, sizing on the V2 Max is on par with the Oakley Radar XL - definitely tall (the difference between the V2 Max and the regular V2 is only in its height - not width or stem length) coming in around 50mm at the top above the nose, and potentially in the way if you like your helmet to sit low on your forehead. Otherwise, excellent vertical and periphery coverage. Crazy multi-sport versatile, and if you score the White or Acid Yellow colorway, Euro-fabulous too.

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5 5

I have the older Xenon jersey, and the new 2.0 offers a welcome round of improvements without compromising on the foundation of the kit: its superlative fit and air-channeling capabilities. Gone is the see-through mesh around the stomach, with more strategically (and modestly) placed ventilation around the shoulders and underarms. The jersey itself is constructed of a much lighter weight and better ventilated fabric, negating the need for overt ventilation panels. Gore also went with a full-length, locking zipper for quick and generous access to cooler air. There's nothing about the Xenon 2.0 kit to not like - and it's quickly becoming a renewed favorite in my rotation.

* I've always been a Medium with Gore, and the Xenon fits just as slim as expected

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