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#1204 of 1920 2 points

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  • 9 Reviews 3 Helpful
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  • 31 Answers 2 Helpful
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Lightweights are better, although that is opinion. I wouldn't jump on these wheels until they have more miles in use/longer track record, especially considering the Paul Lew connection. Lightweight, meanwhile, has a proven track record. Of course, I should add that I have never ridden a Reynolds wheelset and have two Lightweight wheelsets (Standard III and Ventoux with Tune hub-still not sure which is faster). I guess you can replace a spoke on the RZR . . . but if you never break a spoke on a Lightweight wheel, does that matter? (I believe the Standards have even been used for cross country races by professional riders in the past).

No, but it's hard to get an exact on weight limits anyway because the nature of the riding is usually a more important factor than only taking rider weight into account. Also, wheel companies want to do as little warranty replacement as possible so they don't want to replace a wheel when you jumped off a 12-foot cliff and cracked your rim in half just because you are under the "rider weight limit." Even the lightest weight limit wheels will hold up under just about all road cycling conditions for everyone except possibly professional riders and their higher wattage output during sprints. Yes there are static weight limits on wheels where the rim will break/buckle under a certain static load (i.e. no movement just added weight), but that's more like 1000lbs. because the jarring it will take when riding will mimic these kinds of forces on a 175 or 250 lb rider on certain impacts/bumps. If you are concerned about potentially catastrophic failure (i.e. break in the rim throws you over the handlebars or out into traffic), I would suggest always "breaking in" a new wheelset by riding it under the easiest conditions first, getting used to the feel, flex, and the creaks (if there are any) and then gradually go more all out from there. Heavier riders will get more flex out of wheels, but they won't actually break. All wheels, even full carbon/carbon spokes, will flex quite a bit before they will fail/break so you should be able to tell the limits if you ever actually approach them before you actually break anything.

yes, especially if you have shimano on it right now it should work no problem (all of the newest components mount/install in pretty much the same way they have for years) although depending on if you plan on replacing the whole groupset at once or gradually upgrading, mixing with the older components may or may not work/work well depending on what you buy/keep.

Moving up to Ultegra will make for smoother drivetrain/shifting but maintenance is the most important aspect of getting a smooth drivetrain-no matter how expensive the components are they must be properly (meaning regularly) cleaned/degreased and lubed. Installation/tweaking of the drivetrain is also a factor if you are installing yourself or having the LBS do it make sure you (or they) know what they are doing. A little patience in adjusting limit screws, etc. will be worthwhile in the long run.

28 tooth should be fine-rated cog capacity is usually correlated to what size cassettes the manufacturer is offering at the time. Shimano's largest cassette cog offered was 27 tooth when the 6600 series came out. With the 6700 series they added the 28-tooth option. More info. here under capacity: http://sheldonbrown.com/gloss_ca-g.html.

It's hard to get an exact on weight limits because the nature of the riding is usually a more important factor than only taking rider weight into account. Also, wheel companies want to do as little warranty replacement as possible so they don't want to replace a wheel when you jumped off a 12-foot cliff and cracked your rims just because you are under the "rider weight limit." Even the lightest weight limit wheels will hold up under just about all road cycling conditions for everyone except possibly professional riders and their higher wattage output. Yes there are static weight limits on wheels where the rim will break/buckle under a certain static load (i.e. no movement just added weight), but that's more like 1000lbs. because the jarring it will take when riding will mimic these kinds of forces on a 175 or 250 lb rider on certain impacts/bumps. If you are concerned about potentially catastrophic failure (i.e. break in the rim throws you over the handlebars or out into traffic), I would suggest always "breaking in" a new wheelset by riding it under the easiest conditions first, getting used to the feel, flex, and the creaks (if there are any) and then gradually go more all out from there. Heavier riders will get more flex out of wheels, but they won't actually break. All wheels, even full carbon/carbon spokes, will flex quite a bit before they will fail/break so you should be able to tell the limits if you ever actually approach them before you actually break anything.

Why not go with a 10spd cassette as you are putting in 10 spd derailleurs? Unless you want to keep the shifters/chain 9spd. Either way, if you want faster you should go with a lower number of teeth in the rear such as 11-something (11 tooth is the smallest you can get). Remember lower teeth on the rear translate to faster wheel spin/faster speed. The top gear range will be best determined by what kind of terrain you are riding. If you ride on flat terrain, go with 11-23 because you don't need the high gears and you have more options in the lower/faster gears. If you have a lot of hills then go with 11-25 or 11-28 as the higher gears will help on the inclines. Your crankset (standard vs compact vs triple) will also help determine how fast you go at a certain cadence. A 53-tooth big front ring will go faster/at a lower cadence than a 50-tooth. Any higher number of rings than 28 is usually used for MTB bikes that go steep uphill on dirt. Then you should get MTB derailleurs/full drivetrain.

Yes it will help if you find yourself on the small front ring and the largest rear ring and still not able to get the cadence you want, no you don't have to replace your chain. You should avoid riding on the 53 front ring and the 28 tooth rear anyway as it stresses your drivetrain too much to have it crossed liked that, and that is the only combo that might have an issue with chain length. Are you sure you have 53/34 up front? That doesn't sound right, as it is not a stock combo that Shimano makes. Usually you have 53/39 (130 BCD) or 50/34 (compact 110 BCD). A 53/34 is possible on a compact crankset but I've not seen it and you would likely have shifting issues anyway (i.e. dropped chains) with such as large difference. If you have 53/39 up front currently you could also switch to a compact crankset to help with the hills (50/34) although you would need to buy a whole new crankset (because the bolt circle diameter or BCD must be smaller to get less than a 39 tooth).

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