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Noah Singer

Noah Singer

park city, ut

Noah Singer's Passions

Snow Skiing
Road Biking
Mountain Biking
Triathlon

Noah Singer's Bio

I began working for Competitive Cyclist when I was 15, I cleaned up cat poop. Literally. I'm now the Product Manger for the site, meaning I make the best decision possible for everything you see and feel while spending time with us.

Between my early days and now I went to Fort Lewis College in Durango, CO. I'm a five time National Champion. I raced for the USA National Team at the 2004 MTB World Championships in France, and the Pan American games in Ecuador that same year.

I have a lovely wife and daughter and spend time racing mountain bikes, traveling in our Airstream Bambi and obsessing over Product and Design.

Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on July 31, 2015

Wide, strong and light. Not cheap.
5 5

A flatbar is not as simple as it seems. You need to account for strength, feel, size and sweep. Enve nails them all here. They have an amazing reputation with their bars, unlike players like Easton. Feel is the carbon... not all is created equal. Myself and a few riding buddies used to ride a Truvativ Noir, their top of the line. It was way too stiff in some engineering way and rattled us silly. This doesn't. Finally, this has just enough sweep, the slight bend back as you get towards the grips. It's really perfect. 760mm is a great XC width these days, and can always be cut down if needed.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on July 31, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

It's really nice that Mavic offers such a simple swap so you can keep the second most expensive part of your bike while upgrading parts. The instructions not very clear but I was able to get the job done. Here's the only complaint, making this 4 instead of 5 start. When swapping there are four TINY springs you must move from the old freehub body to this one. If you loose even one on the garage floor you are screwed. I doubt local bike shops would have any stocked, you might get lucky in their junk drawer though. So -- execution is simple but go into your "clean room so you don't loose a spring.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on July 28, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've ridden Continental X-King tires for years. I finally switched to these b/c of the good reviews and they looked more XC. They are light, I run them tubeless just fine even in rock-garden infested Utah. They corner well and the wide spacing makes them incredibly versatile. Put them on and forget about them...

...forget about them until they wear out. My rear wore out after 275 hot summer miles. I ride pretty hard, but this was soon than I had hoped. The front is still going strong. I replaced the rear with the Barzo so look for a review coming on that.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on July 28, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

Calling this a jersey is like calling Chuck Taylors basketball shoes in today's terms. It works as such, but is more casual than tech. It's 100% cotton afterall. The raglan style is slick and the color is top notch. Ride hard in the cool evenings and head straight to the bar without looking like Joe Fred thinking he's in the Tour de France.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on July 28, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I loath a big saddle bag. The only thing I loathe more is breaking down 40 miles from home in the mountains with no tools/tube. This bag works on my 29er MTB. It barely fits these contents- but does: 29" tube, 16g Co2, 20g Co2, tire lever (cut down) mini Co2 head.

In the past I had a problem with velcro wearing out, so I use a Voile strap around the seatrails and bag to keep it in place. I also suggest that strap incase of an emergency of other sorts; that's why it's called "backcountry duct tape".

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on July 28, 2015

Solid as a rock. rolls right over them
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I'm on my second Highball now, both 29ers. In between I had a Scott Spark 29er (read: XC speed) and a Santa Cruz 5010 (read: fun). I've come full circle and I'm back on the trusty Highball. Aside from it also being the name of my post-ride cocktail, there are many things to love about the latest iteration of this trusty machine. For full disclosure, I work for Competitive Cyclist; now here is why I say that. At one point, 7 of 10 fastest employees rode this bike. We loved it, most had it geared, a few had it setup single speed with a Philcentric BB (which is great).

Whats' new and great: the aqua color is radical. The internal routing makes the frame look really slick to match the pilot. That said, it's a total bitch to setup. for the rear brake, which was the worst I had to cut the hose and feed it from ass-end forward. Starting at the rear brake mount I tried to route it into the internal sleeve and after about 40 minutes and enough brake oil spilled to mistake it for a job owned by British Petroleum by the time I was done. Amazingly, the Shimano XT brakes (which I praise too) accepted a new sleeve on the end and actually feel 95% of what they should.

The rear derailleur cable rattles a bit in the frame. After 350 miles I still haven't fixed it, I will call Santa Cruz soon. I'm usually in the zone so much with my Spotify rocking that I don't notice it.

The frame is strong as nails. I shred hard. I've broken a few frames from said shredding. I've never broken a SCZ though and have no plans on this being the first.

Geometry is perfect. If I ever order a custom frame (for material/style/ride), I will reference this geometry chart.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on July 28, 2015

The Tesla is faster than the Ferrari
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Reference the title; A Tesla is about $80k and can do 0-60 faster than a $450k Ferrari. Now, it should also be pointed out that the Tesla built completely different. While these XT brakes are not fundamentally different than any other hydraulic disc brake out there, they work just as well or better than the more expensive type. I've ridden very nice bikes for years and I always equip them with XT brakes. Never XTR, never, NEVER SRAM/Avid. I'd prefer to save that money and put it elsewhere that will improve performance in a noticeable way. Get these brakes and you won't be disappointed. I promise.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on July 28, 2015

3 5

Familiarity: I returned this product before using it

POC is a design focused company, but from what I'm learning first-hand that doesn't always always include research and development. These shorts look great in the photos and such, I dig the subtle design. The material is a nice weight, not too light or heavy. My reason for return was the length. I am more XC than DH, so let that be known. These hung way too far over the knee for me, even when seated on the bike. It would drive me bonkers to pedal with that rubbing over the front of me knee.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on May 7, 2015

Solid and simple
4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

You don't need a carbon bar. ProTour riders often pick the aluminum variety because if your bike simply tips over and you crack a carbon bar under your bar tape you won't know until it sheers in two crossing that cattle-guard at 36mph. There is no rotational weight here so a savings in grams in hardly noticed. Opt for the aluminum variety, save a ton of money and risk, and ultimately look more PRO. This one has a traditional shape which means you'll be a bit lower when in the drops. The subtle flats on top are very nice, especially on rough roads. The added surface area reduces fatigue in your hands, then arms, then shoulders...and so on, putting more watts to your legs and core where it matters.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on April 23, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I ride a set of Enve M60's with DT 240 hubs. People often ask me if they should get these hubs or Chris King on their next bike. My response -- Basically, you get Chris King if you want to prance around and say you have a quality hub, then at night you don?t mind working on it. You get DT Swiss if you actually want a quality hub and at night you?d rather ride then just drink a few beers after.

I've had both and put a lot of miles on each. King is good, but has a break-in period, that is longer than a few rides and requires constant adjustment to keep them running like a tight ship. As far as DT, I've never touched them.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on March 11, 2015

Arc'teryx and Assos just made a baby...
5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

...that's how it was phrased on Bicycling Magazine. They were right. I'm lucky enough to the owner of several Assos items, and I ski (resort and backcountry) in Arc'teryx. It's the nicest money can buy. Bring together the minds, designers, marketing and sales folks from each company and you get 7Mesh.

Fit - It's made to be ridden in. I'm 6'0" 156lbs. I have long arms. I wear a small because I like form-fitting pieces. It is slightly tight on my chest when I stand up-right but in the saddle it is perfect. There is not too much bunch in the chest and the arms are long enough.

Features that matter - Why has it taken so long to include pass-through zippers on the rear rather than more pockets? I wear a jersey under my jacket, I don’t need a total of 6 pockets. This solves that with two horizontal zippers that also act has vents which is very handy.

Thin drawstrings keep things tight around the waste just the way I like it. Two front pockets are there and handy when commuting with a phone but I wouldn’t use them for long rides. However, when spending this much on a riding jacket that makes it more versitle off the bike, which helps justify the cost. It’s Gore-Tex Pro after all and is meant to summit peaks above 25,000 feet. I’ll use this for ski touring too, to that point.

Hood - A snapoff hood is awesome when you need it. Its like 4x4 on a truck. Most of the time you don’t need it, but when you do it’s a lifesaver. This fits snug under your helmet and doesn’t bunch at all. And those snaps…can a snap be called sexy? Yes.

Fit - It's made to be ridden in. I'm 6'0" 156lbs. I have long arms. I wear a small because I like form-fitting pieces.

I wouldn't call this a Road or MTB jacket in particular. It's just a riding jacket meant for the people that expect the most. It's subtle design will look good for at least a decade. I LOVE the Goldstone. It's not "Tour de France" yellow, but more like earth tone yellow, more gold as the name implies.

Bottom line - If you want to own a single jacket for all riding types, and other adventures too this is it. There is not elastic to wear out and the material is durable yet breathable enough for snagging up a few KOM's when nobody else is out riding in that shit weather.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a question about on January 22, 2015

Although I am typically not a fan of Schwalbe because of the horrific luck I've had with cuts, the tread pattern of this tire looks ideal for long gravel grinder races like the Leadville Trail 100. That race I have done, and if there tire were around in 2011 I would have considered it. The other part is that it's a 29er, which is the only wheel that should be ridden at those types of races. Does anyone have first hand experience?

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on December 4, 2014

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I previously used a Salsa QR clamp but switched on my new SCZ 5010 Carbon for these reasons:

1) The Salsa has a really long QR arm. It helps with leverage but might actually allow too much, cracking your post.

2) The long, pointy QR arm is literally a pain in your ass while sitting on your top tune, hanging out at the top of the climb waiting for ride buddies.

3) It's Santa Cruz and will match your bike.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerposted an image about on December 4, 2014

A sleeper glove that is among the best

I have awful circulation and I live at 7,000 feet. I need the best globe I can get and I hate bulk. All of that is a tough combination to assemble. This does it though. I only have about five rides in them so far but was anxious to post this soon for everyone to know. The gloves are tough. They are extremely warm without bulk. The black/black is slick and will double as my Nordic ski glove without being too loud.


They are Euro too. What else need be said?

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on October 13, 2014

2 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I was overwhelmed with when I saw WTB release such a fat tire for cyclocross bikes. From my MTB background I know volume is king. I own a 2014 Ibis Hakkalugi Disc with an ENVE disc fork.

When I installed the tires on my Crossmax SLR wheels I could tell the tire/frame clearance would be a bit snug on the back, and have ample room on the front with the ENVE fork. On my first ride, within about 15 minutes I heard the first bit of tire rub on the rear. I don't know if the tire expanded a little or the wheel shifted, but it was rubbing the frame ever so slightly near the bottom bracket junction. I centered the wheel in the dropouts, cranked down the quick-release but it didn't fix it. I found the quickest route home as to not wear my frame anymore, and removed the tire.

This tire in 40C does not fit into a Hakkalugi. It does however fit in the ENVE fork, so if you have that on another frame give it a shot or only run it on the front.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerposted an image about on September 3, 2014

You need only one bike. Period.

You need only one mountain bike. You need this bike. I've raced competitively for 12 years. I've ridden for sponsors and have been unsponsored. XC, Short Track, Enduro and Marathon. These days, I own a single bike, and this is it. A recent weekend looked like this:
Friday - Race the Pro fat tire crit, all on city streets, at the Grand Junction Off-Road in Colorado.
Sunday - Race Pro 40 mile XC, on arguably the most technical XC in America at that same race.
Monday - Do lift-access runs for hours at Deer Valley, UT on "Expert only, downhill bike required" trails.

During those three days, I never changed a single thing on the bike aside from dropping the seatpost four inches on Sunday. I ride Enve M60 wheels, Continental X-King 2.4 tires, and XT brakes. The bike weighs in at 24 pounds.

I work at Competitive Cyclist, I race the fast races and I do the fun rides. I could have several bikes and I could have any bike, but this is the one and only.

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