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Jon J

Jon J

Salt Lake City

Jon J's Passions

Snow Skiing
Road Biking
Mountain Biking
Triathlon

Jon J's Bio

I grew up on Colorado's Front Range, and have now spent extended time in Wyoming and Utah as well. Salt Lakes 4K elevation is the lowest I've ever lived at.
After me knees had had enough of running competitively in college, I transitioned to XC mtn bike racing. A great cardiovascular system and lower leg strength made the transition very easy. Now a days with a family I race less, but like to get out for a ride any chance I get. I'm the Yeti Cycles brand ambassador here at Competitive, and have ridden Yeti's for 10 years now. I'm currently loving my SB95c and am happy to answer any questions regarding all things Yeti.


“FOLLOW” ME FOR REVIEWS ON CYCLING GEAR & DON'T HESITATE TO CALL FOR ALL YOUR GEAR QUESTIONS AND NEEDS AT (801-736-6396) EXT. 4378 OR EMAIL ME AT JJAKUPCAK@BACKCOUNTRY.COM


Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on December 27, 2016

4 5

Familiarity: I returned this product before using it

Really wanted these glasses to work out, but the bridge of my nose just didn't agree with the adjustable nose pads. I'd say I have a medium to small sized face, and coverage of the lens was good, didn't look too big on my face, and didn't have a large gap between my temple and the frame.

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Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on December 9, 2016

Fun +
5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I was able to put the SB5+ through the paces for 3 days during a trip to Summit County, CO this fall. I've had the SB5 in the past, and presently have SB4.5 in the garage, so it's safe to say I'm a disciple of the Switch Infinity linkage suspension. The SB5+ follows in the same vein as the other bike of the SB lineup with incredible pedaling efficiency and power transfer paired with a supple, bottomless, feel once things get pointed downhill.
I didn't have a scale with me, I'd put the Yeti'™s claimed weight of 28lbs without pedals as being pretty accurate. My SB45 weights 26.5 with Enve wheels/pedals, and the SB5+ didn't feel much heavier in hand, or riding on the trail. The benefits of plus tires proved true, with confidence inspiring grip in loose conditions, and forgiving float over chunk rock gardens. I was tentative about flatting, so I ran what I felt was a higher than normal pressure of 15/16 PSI F/R for my 140lb frame, and had no punctures to speak of, so credit to the Maxxis Rekons there. My biggest day was a ride over the Ten Mile Range from Copper Mtn ski area into the town of Frisco. Going up, the plus tires had grip for days, and if I had the capacity to turn the pedals, the bike would have kept going, but damn did it get steep! Once on top, and coming down through the scree and roots and rocks, the SB5+ only inspired more and more confidence.
The last day I decided to experiment, and moved my 29" Enve M60 boost wheels onto the SB5+, clearance was a non-issue on both the rear triangle, and the 27.5+ Boost Fox fork (photo'™d below). Ride wise the bikes geo wasn't adversely affected, and I didn'™t notice and difference in steering or feel. The most noticeable thing was the reduced wheel weight going from an alloy 27.5+ setup to a carbon 29" setup with 2.35 tires. I charged down the last part of the descent I had ridden the previous day on the 27.5+ wheels with the same confidence and speed. BB height on the stock SB5+ is on the lower end at 13", and I did notice more rock strikes initially, but never felt it was a constant problem. Overall I came away very impressed with the SB5+, I don't race regularly any longer, but still like a fast, capable bike. Should the occasional race pop up, I'd have no problem calling the 29" wheels into duty.

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Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on November 22, 2016

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

The G4 cranks raise the game. While only shedding 15g over the previous SLs, the G4 crank arms are stiffer and have a much improved aesthetic in my opinion. While increased stiffness is tough to evaluate on the bike, these are noticeably stiffer under offset load than the new Eagle X01 cranks. The cranks include a set of black crank boots to keep things tidy. At release, RaceFace also had a carbon spidered chainring, however those have been tabled for the time being.

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Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on November 9, 2016

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

Used this in a recent 24hr race between laps, and it did the trick. Doing a hard lap every 3 hours on our four man team, I never had that "race gut" feeling. The vanilla mix tastes like a melted milkshake, and isn't a chalky consistency like other recovery mixes I've tried in the past. Great to mix up in bottle for the ride home from a hard effort!

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Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on November 9, 2016

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've been on my M60's since March, and they continue to amaze. Their reliability and durability is without questions. My use has been more like abuse of these.

Ridden 3 miles down on a flat tire, check (FYI - You'll want to carry a 48mm stemmed tube.

Charged wantonly into rock fields at questionable speeds - check.

Run sub 20 PSI in both tires - check.

Hear the aching "thung" of carbon on rock in the 2nd of 7 laps of a 24hr race, and ride the ensuing 5 with a hop in the wheel with out issue - check

Previous alloy wheels I've owned would have failed long ago under the same abuse these Enves have withstood.

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Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on October 20, 2016

Get pumped
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

If your garage is full of mountain bikes, make room for the Chamber HV pump. Gone are my days of guesstimating pressure around the 20PSI line. The Chambers massive dial, and individual PSI marks make setting exact pressures a cinch. If there was any flaw in the pump, its that the dial going up to 50 PSI was too much, they could have easily stopped at 30-35 PSI for modern mountain tires, even that might be on the high end. The unit as a whole is solid and stable. The metal base keeps it upright without issue, and the hose is plenty long, and has a good clip to keep it wrapped around the pump when not in use. I can easily reach valve stems with my bike in the stand. The machined handle is bolted on with the same 31.6 clamp of a handlebar. In the future maybe I'll put some cut down bars and grips on it for a personal touch.

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Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on August 25, 2016

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I've really been impressed with my X-Project 1s. The carbon sole is stiff where you need it for pedaling, but has a noticeable flex when you're walking or have to hike-a-bike. The BOA provides an even, snug fit, and doesn't loosen like some velcro straps will over time.
I would call the fit true to size. I have the same 41 as I've worn in every other shoe I've had, that being said, I do have a hair less room in front of my toe compared to my Giros, but I chalk that up to personal preference. My pair of 41s with crank bros cleats weighs in at 700 grams for the pair.

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Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on July 17, 2016

Mount Up!
4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

RockyMounts brings a solid contender to the hitch mounted rack field. I've previously owned the Yakima HoldUp, and have used a buddy's Kuat NV quite a bit. The Splitrail is on par with both of those. Though having a claimed weight of 44lbs for the 2in receiver option, the rack feels lighter, and more balanced than the HoldUp which claims to be 39lbs.
It took me 30 minutes to install the Splitrail, and assembly is very straightforward and easy with the included hex wrenches. The hitch's fir system creates a very stable interface, with no wobble, but can be in issue if you're moving the rack from one car to another regularly. The rear handle for adjusting the position of the rack is also a strong point. The rack has ample clearance for 29 and 27+ tires. Though RockyMounts doesn't recommend it, I was bale to fit my fatbike with 4.8 tires onto the rack with a ski strap, but do so at my own peril.
The locking system is a weak point in my opinion compared to other offering. A cable extends from the arms, and a metal chuck locks into the end of the cable creating a loop. No rack's included lock/cable is very substantial, they're all there to keep people honest, but the Splitrail's system limits where you can loop the cable. If I were leaving bikes on the rack during an extended period of time, I'd use a thicker cable looped through the hitch like I have with my HoldUp.
Overall the Splitrail is a great rack, that's easy to use, and will get you and your bike to and from the trail with ease.

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Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on May 16, 2016

Teller on the Mountain
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I pretty much lived in these shorts on our last trip to Moab. I've got 2 pairs, a small and medium. My waist is 31", and the smalls fit fine, and the mediums are a little big, but leave better length for use with knee pads. They also have an internal cinch at the wast. The front zip pockets keep anything safe when you're on the bike, and are great for keeping stuff organized pre and post ride. A velcro rear pocket also comes in handy for day to day use. I've even left my wallet back there on a ride and did notice it until I got back to the car.

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Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on April 12, 2016

BIgger. Faster. Stronger.
5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I had the pleasure of spending a pre-launch weekend in Moab aboard the SB5.5. If I could have brought the bike home with me, I would have, but I'€™d also need to bring all the rocks home as well. The SB5.5 only further blurs the line of a bikes capability along the trail/all-mountain/enduro spectrum.

Full disclosure, I'm a Yeti guy, the ASR, ASR-5c, SB95c, SB5c, ASRc have all spent time in my garage, and the SB4.5c presently is tenured there.

Forget all you preconceived notions about a €"œlong travel" 29er. "€œA 160mm fork will feel too raked out and wander up climbs"€ -€“ wrong. "€œThe wheelbase will be too long and hamper maneuverability" -€“ wrong. "€œ29ers are dumb€" -€“ wrong again.

I'€m 5'€™7"€, and rode a medium SB5.5 with ease and comfort. The Switch Infinity heart of the 5.5 stays true, and will claw its way up anything as long as you keep the pedals turning. Going up the Amasa Back jeep road, and Hymasa trail, the 5.5 felt similar to my 4.5. Efficiency wasn't an issue with the additional inch of rear travel, and the 160mm Fox 36 could be pulled up steeps and step-ups with the ease of my 140mm Fox 34. Where the 5.5 separates itself from its shorter travel sibling, as it should, is once you point it downhill. It'€™d been 3 years since I'd last descended Porcupine Rim on my then ASR5c, the SB5.5 made 2013 feel like the dark ages. The Fox 36 came to life will all of its 160mm of "keep your teeth in your head"€ travel. The Infinity link feels supple and bottomless; a coworker took the 5.5 off a 6 ft drop; all he was asking for at the bottom was another bottomless token for the fork. This bikes wants the A lines, and the faster the better.

As Yeti puts it, this is a purpose built bike, and the spec follows suit. No plus-size tire shenanigans on this machine. A meaty 2.5 Minion DHF tire breaks the trail, and aesthetically brings proportion to the Boost 110 Fox 36 fork. The Float X Factory DPS shock sits in back, and will leave you asking "What happened to that rocky section?"€ A Reverb dropper is stock on all complete offerings, and all come in at less than 29lbs.

Geometrically, the SB5.5 proves form equals function. The medium frame has the same 90mm headtube length as my small 4.5 to keep things balanced, standover is lower too. The wheelbase for a medium is 1168mm, 20mm shorter than a medium SB6, and only 3mm longer than the SC Hightower that uses a 140mm fork. The 66.5 head angle keeps things stable at speed, but the paired 73.6 seat angle makes that fork feel shorter on the climbs.

If you have any other questions about the SB5.5c, or any of Yeti'™s offerings, don'€™t hesitate to give me a shout. My direct contact line is 801-736-6396 x4378, e-mail is jjakupcak@backcountry.com

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Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on December 21, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I returned this product before using it

My head measures 55cm, and the small was not going to happen, couldn't even get in over the crown of my head. I'm always between S and M for helmets, and based on Bells size chart, I was hoping the small may give a lower profile fit.

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Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on December 21, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

Construction on these boots is great, and the materials, closure, and design give a strong first impression.
In terms of sizing, i feel the boots run large. I've always worn a US 8 and all my cycling shoes have been a EU 41, and I've always had a pinkie finger's width of room between my toes and the front of the shoe. Lake equates a US 8 to a EU 42 in their size chart. I tried on a 40, 41, and 42, and the 41s fit best, I had on a slim sock, but there was still room if I were wearing a warmer winter sock. The 40s weren't too small, but wouldn't have had room for a thicker sock. The 42s had more room than I needed. As for width, I don't wear a an E size shoe or anything, but my feet probably lean towards the wide end of normal. These weren't narrow feeling, and I didn't feel like the wide variant would provide a better fit.

Contact me with any questions here at Competitive at 801-736-6396 x4378, or jjakupcak@backcountry.com

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Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on November 16, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I got to ride the SB4.5c at a dealer event this summer, and this bike flat out impresses. The 4.5 was one of the few bikes that felt effortlessly faster on the first ride than my current bike (the much loved SB66, and the Pivot Mach 6 being the others). I previously owned and loved the SB95c, and couldn't wait for Yeti to slap the Switch Infinity suspension into that frame. With the geometry carrying over similarly from the SB95, only the chainstays and rear travel have shortened. The 10mm drop in travel had me initially scratching my head, but the bottomless feel of the Switch Infinity link, and increased stiffness of the Boost fork and rear end left no lack of confidence in pointing the bike down and hanging on for the ride. At 5’7” - 140 lb, frame stiffness is rarely something I notice, much less stress, but the SB4.5c is the stiffest frame Yeti has ever made, and it noticeably holds its line through rough and off camber terrain. The chain stays are also the shortest of any bike in Yeti’s lineup (even the 27.5 SB5), and gives the 4.5c a wheelbase-defying playfulness on the trail. After riding, I was sure the wheelbase was half an inch shorter than the SB95, not a quarter inch longer. After comfortably riding a medium SB5 and ASR with short stems, I opted for the small SB4.5 frame as the smaller 29er frame gives me a more “balanced” feeling, and that again held true. Overall the SB4.5c is the well-rounded trail bike Yeti set out to make, light enough to hold its own on an XC startline, but stiff and slack enough to be able to throw line choice to the wind and put a grin on the faces of those who can hold on and stay off the brakes. Give me a call or email if I can answer any other questions about the SB4.5c: JJakupcak@backcountry.com / 801-736-6396 x4378

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Jon J

Jon Jwrote a review of on November 9, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

The Air Liner has quickly become one of my go-to chamois, putting it in company with Assos and Giordana bibs. The 10mm thick chamios provides all day comfort without the "diaper" feeling of other offerings. The bib straps help keep everything in place, and the sizing is true to form. I'm 5'7", 140lbs, and wear a small in just about every bibs (medium in Castelli), and the small Air Liners are on par. Grab a pair and put them on under your favorite baggies, or even consider these as a piece to help keep the sweat down on the trainer.

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