Free Shipping on Orders Over $50* »
Garson Fields

Garson Fields

Park City

Garson Fields's Bio

Grew up in Western Mass, then spent a few years in Vermont before relocating to Utah. Between family, swimming holes, and the mountain biking, my heart will forever be in New England. I love to pedal, despite growing up racing Downhill. When I'm not writing copy for Competitive Cyclist, I'm usually riding bikes, snowboarding, drinking coffee, or some combination thereof.

0 Comments

Garson Fields

Garson Fieldswrote a review of on March 1, 2016

Fantastic
5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

My much-loved Mavic Stratos shorts have finally met their match. Like the Stratos, these qualify as XC-weight trail baggies, so if you're prone to hitting the deck every time you ride, you may want something burlier. The fabric is exceptionally lightweight and plenty stretchy, and surprisingly enough, they've shrugged off a handful of crashes to date. The included liner short is fairly basic, but unlike many included liners they have a chamois that's actually worth riding. They're cut well above the knee, which is great for unrestricted pedaling.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Garson Fields

Garson Fieldswrote a review of on March 1, 2016

Proven Trail Lid
4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

The Trabec checks off all the boxes for a trail helmet. It's plenty light, adequately well ventilated, fits true to size, and looks good. My two gripes are that the retention system isn't quite as secure as the click wheel you'll find on some other helmets, and I prefer the added coverage at the base of the skull afforded by a TLD A1 or POC's new Tectal.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Garson Fields

Garson Fieldswrote a review of on March 1, 2016

Race Grade Rubber
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Came off a few years of primarily riding the Minion DHF up front, with trimmed Wet Screams as my intermediate/wet conditions alternative. I spent last season on the Super Gravity Magic Mary, ran through a handful, and I can see why these have largely surpassed the Minions as an all-conditions option among the pros. They're essentially a trimmed spike with a larger volume. They roll adequately fast for a soft compound tire, with excellent edging grip and braking traction. Wear rate is about in line with other soft compound tires (similar to Maxxis Super Tacky, wears faster than 3C). The SG casing does give up some durability to a true dual-ply, especially as the casing wears out, but I've found that replacing them at reasonable intervals yields adequate flat resistance. FWIW, I have it on good authority that the Giant factory downhill team has been racing the SG casing with a run-of-the-mill tubeless setup successfully for the past two seasons. As for trail bike use, they're ideal for enduro racing, but for anything less demanding, they're likely overkill.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Garson Fields

Garson Fieldswrote a review of on January 6, 2016

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

It's not the only stem worth running, but you won't find one that's better. Light, stiff, burly, elegant, plenty of sizes -- there's not much to dislike about the X4.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Garson Fields

Garson Fieldswrote a review of on January 6, 2016

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

There are lighter and longer-lasting tires out there, but for something that rolls fast, grips hard, and offers real protection against flats and rim damage, the Super Gravity Rock Razor has few equals. Despite the micro-knob center tread, they have a surprising amount of braking traction, and the cornering knobs bite hard across a broader range of trail conditions than you might guess. They wear out fairly fast, especially if you're riding rocky terrain, but the tradeoff will be worthwhile for racers and those who appreciate race-grade rubber.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Garson Fields

Garson Fieldswrote a review of on July 24, 2014

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

It's light, long, low, and slack. Handling is very close to the SB-75 (and the SB-95, for that matter), but the steering is a touch more relaxed. As for Switch Infinity, the ride is similar to the Switch Link-equipped SB's, but the SB5 is noticeably smoother when the shuttle changes direction (compressing past the sag point). Basically, it's the same formula as the other trail-oriented SuperBikes, just a bit more potent.

TL:DR; it's awesome-- seriously, what did you expect?

(1)

 

0 Comments

Garson Fields

Garson Fieldswrote a review of on December 19, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

The Bronson isn't for everyone. Designed for the Syndicate's Enduro World Series campaign, it's built to as a precision tool for riding as fast as possible in challenging terrain. It's more composed at speed than the shorter travel 5010, but it lacks the trail-erasing feel of the Nomad. Instead, there's sufficient feedback to feel your tires gripping, and it takes the work out of boosting trail features. It's fast and responsive, and handles best when ridden with conviction. Of all the bikes I rode in 2013, the Bronson is my favorite, with its closest competition being Yeti's stellar SB66c. Many (most?) riders will be better served by the more conservative 5010, but if you climb fast so you can race back down, the Bronson is a cool, calculated trail killer with very few equals.

(1)

 

0 Comments

Garson Fields

Garson Fieldswrote a review of on December 19, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

The 5010 has quickly become a staff favorite, and for a very good reason-- it rips. Up or down, through turns or over doubles, it responds instinctively to rider input, while maintaining composure beyond what you'd expect from a five-inch trail bike. My only gripe is that when pushed to the limit, a 5010 can overwhelm the flexy 32mm forks they're typically built with. Gravity fiends will prefer the Bronson for its longer wheelbase and extra travel, but the 5010 is a bike that any mountain biker will feel at home on, with little or no adjustment period.

(1)