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Item # CST009X

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Item # CST009X

Ride no matter what.

The clouds are grey in every direction, and a snowy, rainy sleet has been pelting your shoulders and rolling off your helmet for your entire ride. Home is miles away, and your soaking wet gloves aren't doing much to stop your hands from stinging with cold in your drops. Sound familiar? Inspired by the hand-numbing March conditions during the past few years at San Remo, Castelli's Tempesta Gloves were made to keep your hands warm and dry on the days when no one in their right mind — or the wrong gloves — would actually head out on a ride.

Castelli's OutDry technology is the cornerstone of the gloves' construction, and it's been updated from last year's version to function as a single barrier against rain, snow, sleet, and whatever else is falling from the sky. The DWR membrane is bonded directly to the main nylon/elastane fabric to give you a single windproof, waterproof layer, which keeps the gloves stretchy and breathable. Castelli also includes a Dry Zone lining on the inside of the gloves to enhance their breathability and keep moisture moving away from your skin when you sweat.

When you're getting ready to head out on your ride, slip the gloves on using the neoprene cuffs — they'll slide easily under your jacket sleeves and will help water stay away from your wrists when you're stretched out in the saddle. Whether you're pedaling along blustering seaside roads in Italy or your familiar local routes, the Tempesta Gloves are made to make sure no degree of bad weather keeps you out of the saddle.

  • Cycling gloves for when the weather isn't cooperating
  • Windproof, water-resistant membrane keeps the elements out
  • High breathability also keeps internal moisture in check
  • Neoprene cuffs maintain a weatherproof seal

Tech Specs

nylon, elastane, DWR coating
neoprene cuff
Claimed Weight:
[large] 108 g
Recommended Use:
Manufacturer Warranty:
1 year

Size chart


Hand Circumference <7.2in
7.2 - 8in
(18.4 - 20.3cm)
8 - 8.7in
(20.3 - 22.2cm)
8.7 - 9.5in
(22.2 - 24.1cm)
9.5 - 10.2in
(24.1 - 26cm)
Hand Circumference <6.5in
6.5 - 7.2in
(16.6 - 18.4cm)
7.2 - 7.9in
(18.4 - 20.2cm)
7.9 - 8.7in
(20.2 - 22cm)
How to Measure:
Measure around the widest part of your hand, excluding the thumb.

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Thoughts on sizing

  • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions
  • Fit: True to size
  • Size Bought: Small

True that the glove fingers are a bit too long, but for me the thumb is a bit tight.

First impressions based on fit, not use.

  • Fit: Runs large
  • Size Bought: X-Small

This isn't a review of actual use. That will come later this Fall or Winter.
Rather, this is a note about sizing. The 5-stars are for Competitive Cyclist customer service.

I purchased size Small (same size as my 3 other pairs of Castelli gloves, full and half-finger model). The Tempesta size Small was a full size too large: 1/2" too long on all fingers and thumb. Competitive Cyclist customer service quickly (as usual) sent the UPS label and DMA for the return. The X-Small arrived in 3 days and fits perfectly. My OutDry gloves from Pearl Izumi and Specialized work great so I expect no less from Castelli.

Are the seams taped?

From OutDry's website:

"OutDry® uses a one-piece patented construction process that creates a waterproof breathable barrier.

This impenetrable layer is heat-bonded directly to the outer fabric, leaving no seams, no gaps, and no way for water to get in. Compare that to traditional waterproof technology. Water gets in and stays in, collecting in the space between the inner and outer layers, making them heavy and wet. OutDry improves fit and dexterity, keeping you drier, lighter and more comfortable."

Makes sense as I think about it and what I've experienced with other OutDry pieces I own (Pearl Izumi, Specialized). I have Gore-Tex gloves where the outer shell is made of Gore-Tex and fully taped with the fleece or light wicking liner stitched in at the glove's hem. The issue is that when pulling your hand out, the liner slides out, too. Another fabrication-type is a non-Gore-Tex shell (sometimes taped and sometimes not, sometimes insulated and sometimes not, sometimes waterproof and sometimes not) with a Gore-Tex liner for water resistance, stitched in at the hem. Issues in this instance may be the liner slipping out, or water penetrating the shell and getting trapped between the liner and shell.

According to the OutDry tech sheet, OutDry heat bonds the breathable membrane directly to the shell and simultaneously seals the seams, thus doing away from the process of taping all the stitched seams (which answers my original question). Several manufacturers have also integrated insulating liners (Thinsulate, Primaloft, wicking layer and fleece) that do not slip out when removing the gloves. These inner layers do not seem to compromise the OutDry waterproofing: my Pearl Izumi PRO WxB Outdry 3 x 1 (discontinued) and WxB PRO Outdry gloves are 3 years old and have been bombproof wet or dry.

The Dry Zone layer may be a wicking layer or an insulating one; I don't know. Maybe someone else can answer that one. If it's a wicking layer, it may be more of a Spring & Fall glove (40 - 50 degrees). If it has a Thinsulate or Primaloft insulating layer, it may be better suited for Winter conditions (30 - 50 degrees). A matter of personal preference and comfort level.